Endymion rolled through Mid-City Feb. 10

by

comment
A model of St. Louis Cathedral lit by color-changing LED lights sits on the front of a float titled "Way Down Yonder in New Orleans/Professor Longhair" in Endmyion's 2018 lineup of super floats. - PHOTO BY KATHERINE M. JOHNSON
  • PHOTO BY KATHERINE M. JOHNSON
  • A model of St. Louis Cathedral lit by color-changing LED lights sits on the front of a float titled "Way Down Yonder in New Orleans/Professor Longhair" in Endmyion's 2018 lineup of super floats.

The great "will-they-or-won't-they" debate of Carnival 2018 ended with a damp but no less deafening roar Saturday as Endymion rumbled through Mid-City on the way to its annual ball/blow out in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. The saga began early last week when the weather reports for Samedi Gras turned ugly, and the threat of a wash out forced Endymion officials to consider changing the parade start time and even the date to dodge the unseasonal showers. There was also speculation that the krewe would abandon its Mid-City route — and the city — entirely, relocating to Jefferson Parish to avoid the inevitable chaos that would result from adding a fourth parade to the Friday Gras Uptown queue.
Marching band members from Saint Paul's School in Covington. - PHOTO BY KATHERINE M. JOHNSON
  • PHOTO BY KATHERINE M. JOHNSON
  • Marching band members from Saint Paul's School in Covington.

However, New Orleans Police Superintendent quashed the confusion Tuesday afternoon when he issued a statement from the police department that amounted to a strong "hail no," explaining that the logistics of rescheduling any parade slated to roll during Carnival's big weekend would be nightmarish, and that all krewes must stick to their predetermined times and dates "in fairness to every parade krewe."

Endymion did end up moving their start time up by about 15 minutes, and while the merits of that change are open for debate, most of Mid-City did enjoy the parade festivities rain-free. Downtown crowds' spirits weren't dampened (although costumes, wigs and other attire certainly were) as the skies opened up and dumped rain on parade revelers farther along the route.

A float titled "When It's Sleepy Time Down South/Big Butter and Egg Man" embodies the songs made famous by New Orleans native Louis Armstrong. Clouds gathered, but most of Mid-City was able to watch the parade rain free. - PHOTO BY KATHERINE M. JOHNSON
  • PHOTO BY KATHERINE M. JOHNSON
  • A float titled "When It's Sleepy Time Down South/Big Butter and Egg Man" embodies the songs made famous by New Orleans native Louis Armstrong. Clouds gathered, but most of Mid-City was able to watch the parade rain free.

The 2018 theme, "Jazz, Our Gift to the World," was a shoutout to New Orleans' cultural contributions to music throughout the years, and was emblazoned on many throws and well represented by the lead totems on the super krewe's 36 LED-lit floats. Float names heralded our city's well-known jazz hits (such as Louis Armstrong's "When it's Sleepy Time Down South" and Professor Longhair's "Way Down Yonder in New Orleans") as well as more obscure compositions ("Snake Rag" by King Oliver) with equal pomp and circumstance.

Many of Endymion's floats are equipped with color-changing LED lights. Despite the relative darkness of tree-lined Canal Street, the floats lit up the night sky. - PHOTO BY KATHERINE M. JOHNSON
  • PHOTO BY KATHERINE M. JOHNSON
  • Many of Endymion's floats are equipped with color-changing LED lights. Despite the relative darkness of tree-lined Canal Street, the floats lit up the night sky.

The parade was a front-loaded, star-studded scene, sporting local and national celebrities alike. Kenner-born musician Jon Batiste (son of the legendary Michael Batiste) was the celebrity grand marshal, having achieved widespread acclaim after becoming the band leader on "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert" in 2015. New Orleans Saints cornerback Marshon Lattimore and running back Alvin Kamara — the 2017 NFL Defensive and Offensive Rookies of the Year, respectively — were special guests of the krewe, riding a float that was positively mobbed by excited Who Dats (so much so that this editor almost lost her camera, hence no photo). Eighties stalwart Rod Stewart and millennial crooner Jason Derulo also rode in the parade and performed at Endymion's Extravaganza.

One of the super krewe's signature floats, "Old Man River." - PHOTO BY KATHERINE M. JOHNSON
  • PHOTO BY KATHERINE M. JOHNSON
  • One of the super krewe's signature floats, "Old Man River."


Sorry, you are using an unsupported browser. This page will not display correctly.
Please click here to upgrade to a newer browser.



Add a comment