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Review: Mood Indigo

Ken Korman says Audrey Tautou is one of the best things in Michel Gondry’s dreamy tale of love

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American-made films with an unmistakably French sensibility have been the hallmark of French director Michel Gondry's unusual career. Movies like Gondry's early masterwork Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (for which he won an Oscar as co-screenwriter) and Be Kind Rewind (in which video clerks remake movies like Ghostbusters after accidentally erasing a store full of tapes) use wildly imaginative visuals to support surreal visions of American culture. Gondry returned to France to make Mood Indigo, an adaptation of Boris Vian's L'Ecume des Jours, a novel so beloved in that country that reading it has become a rite of passage for French teenagers.

  It's hard to imagine material better suited to Gondry's particular gifts than Vian's dreamlike tale of love. The film succeeds at creating a fantastic world in which everyday objects spring to life and a piece of music can change a square room into a circular one, and where vivid colors fade to gray as the story goes from lighthearted to somber. Included are some wonderfully satirical assaults on worthy targets like the working world and highbrow French culture, and Audrey Tautou (Amelie) is a characteristically effervescent leading lady. But for all its visual wizardry, Mood Indigo doesn't add up to what it should — at least in the version created for markets outside of France, which miss 30 minutes cut from the original French film. Cleverness can only take you so far. — KEN KORMAN

Related Film

Mood Indigo

Director: Michel Gondry

Producer: Luc Bossi

Cast: Romain Duris, Audrey Tautou, Gad Elmaleh, Omar Sy, Aissa Maiga, Charlotte Le Bon, Sacha Bourdo, Philippe Torreton, Vincent Rottiers, Laurent Lafitte, Natacha Régnier, Zinedine Soualem and Alain Chabat

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