News » Bouquets & Brickbats: local heroes and zeroes

The Best and the Worst of the Week

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Save NOLA
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a volunteer organization of women who sold T-shirts and caps to raise money for a home in Habitat for HumanityÕs Musicians Village, collected more than $80,000 to help musician Michael Harris realize his dream of home ownership after Hurricane Katrina. Many Save NOLA volunteers also worked on HarrisÕ home Ñ and others Ñ during its construction. The group initially hoped to supplement massive federal housing aid, but it wound up leading the way as public funds became mired in red tape.


Fleur-de-Lis Ambassadors
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a new organization of high-profile volunteers who hope to bring positive news about New Orleans to the rest of America, will make their inaugural trip this week by visiting Boston. The program was unveiled recently by Tulane University President Scott Cowen and City Councilman Arnie Fielkow. Fielkow will join Entergy New Orleans CEO Rod West and Katrina Krewe founder Becky Zaheri on this weekÕs trip to meet with editors, business and civic leaders and other opinion makers in the Boston area.


President George W. Bush

is opposing a 72-mile levee system in south Louisiana known as the Morganza-to-the-Gulf project. The proposed levee, which has unanimous support from LouisianaÕs congressional delegation, would protect 120,000 people and billions in private and public assets from hurricanes and the encroaching Gulf of Mexico. Bush carried Louisiana in both his narrow presidential victories, and this is yet another example of him turning his back on a state that he promised to help rebuild after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.


Illegal dumpers

have turned huge patches of land in eastern New Orleans into possible federal Superfund sites by dumping tires, autos and other sources of toxins along Old Gentilly Road and Almonaster Avenue. Illegal dumping is not new to that area, but the practice has escalated in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. State inspectors checked some 80 properties in that area last week and found that 80 percent of them had potential environmental violations.

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