News » Bouquets & Brickbats: local heroes and zeroes

The Best and the Worst of the Week

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Xavier University
has again distinguished itself by sending more black students to medical school than any other college or university in the United States, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges. In 2001, 94 African-American graduates of Xavier were accepted to medical school. It marks the ninth consecutive year that Xavier has achieved the designation.

Louisiana's Department of Education
has made significant educational reforms recently, according to the journal Education Week, which rated Louisiana No. 4 among the 50 states and Washington, D.C. in its annual rating of education accountability efforts. Education Week gave Louisiana an "A minus" for "standards and accountability." However, the journal says, the state still has much room for improvement on "teacher quality" and "adequacy of resources."

Local business and political leaders
proved a little cooperation can go a long way by brokering an agreement to bring the Charlotte Hornets to New Orleans. Notable among the deal-makers are MetroVision president Bill Hines, Superdome/New Orleans Arena general manager Doug Thornton, Mayor Marc Morial, Jefferson Parish president Tim Coulon, and local lawmakers. The ultimate success of the agreement, however, rests with the willingness of New Orleans residents to support the city's newest sports franchise.

James Tripp,
a longtime employee of the American Legion of Louisiana, admitted he stole about $258,000 from the veterans' organization. Police said Tripp, of Walker, used his position within the organization to write unauthorized checks to himself between 1995 and 2000. Most of the money came from bank accounts for two of the youth groups the Legion is known for supporting: Louisiana Boys State and American Legion Baseball.

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