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Simply the Fest

Count Basin previews the musical offerings of Weekend Two of Jazz Fest.

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Did you get your fill of great music, food, weather and culture during weekend one of Jazz Fest? Of course not; diehard Fest-goers are just getting warmed up, and that's where I, Count Basin, come in. For more than a decade, it's been a Gambit Weekly tradition to be your guide to all the bands playing Jazz Fest, spotlighting all the wondrous sounds that await your ears. New to Jazz Fest? Have no fear, the Count is here. Just follow the handy chronological guide that follows, and learn all the highlights and nuances of every performer at the Fair Grounds. I've added a little lagniappe this year, offering my special endorsement to those bands expected to deliver can't-miss sets. Just look for my bowler's derby accompanying the band description, and you're in for a slice of musical heaven.

So take my hand, and let's head out to the second weekend of Jazz Fest 2002.


THURSDAY, MAY 2

Today's Parades:

3 p.m. Bon Temp Roulez SAPC with Storyville Stompers Brass Band

Mama Efuru

9:40 and 10:10 a.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage; 11:25 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 12:25 p.m., Congo Square Stage

The vocalist known for her work with Los Hombres Calientes and Bill Summers' solo projects performs a kids-oriented set.

New Orleans All City Jazz Outreach

9:45 a.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Modern Jazz

Co-founded by Wynton Marsalis in the mid-80s, this big band student ensemble has performed with local heavyweights like Donald Harrison Jr. and Terence Blanchard, as well as the late great trumpeter Doc Cheatham. Classic and contemporary jazz make up the band's repertoire.

Mahalia Jackson Mass Choir

10:15 a.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Gospel

This choir honors the legacy of New Orleans' greatest gospel singer, often performing songs associated with its namesake.

Dineh Tah Navajo Dancers

11 a.m., Congo Square Stage; 3:15 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

Representing the Navajo (or Dineh) Nation, Dineh Tah is a young mix of male and female dancers performing their tribe's native rituals.

J.C. & Company

11 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Eight neighborhood friends formed this New Orleans ensemble in 1994, after collectively singing with local gospel veterans such as the Mighty Chariots and the New Orleans Spiritualettes. Their sound is rooted in traditional gospel and their debut CD on the local Rampart Street music label is titled Stand Up.

Love Jones

11:15 a.m., Acura Stage, R&B

New Orleans contemporary hip-hop and R&B flavors shine in this recently formed band fronted by female singer Kelly Jones. This is the band's Jazz Fest debut.

Otter Trail Singers

11:15 a.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage; 2 & 4:30 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

New York is home base for this ensemble, which often travels and performs at Native American gatherings across the country.

Spencer Bohren

11:20 a.m., Blues Tent, Blues/Folk

New Orleans bluesman and American music scholar Bohren has been in the national spotlight this year, thanks to guest spots on Garrison Keillor's Prairie Home Companion radio show. Bohren's a compelling live performer who uses an arsenal of guitars -- including a lap steel -- on traditional blues and folk songs, as well as his own originals. His latest CD, Solitaire, hits the streets for Jazz Fest.

Kid Merv & All That Jazz

11:20 a.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

New Orleans trumpeter Kid Merv can mix it up. He was one of the youngest players asked to join the famed Olympia Brass Band, and Merv went on to form the Young Olympians Brass Band. He also plays with the Treme Brass Band. When he's fronting his band, he plays a mix of New Orleans classics and contemporary selections.

Kostini

11:30 a.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

This ensemble takes its name from the Choctaw word for "wise," and that spirit is reflected in its commitment to presenting diverse traditional Native American rituals.

Clancy "Blues Boy" Lewis and Sheba Kimbrough

11:30 a.m., Lagniappe Stage, Blues

This duo plays classic country-style blues with a syncopated New Orleans twist; Kimbrough is best known as Professor Longhair's longtime percussionist.

Culu Childrens' Traditional African Dance Co.

11:30 a.m., Congo Square Stage, African

Youngsters get a chance to experience the history and traditions of African dance and percussion with this ensemble.

Ricky Sebastian

11:30 a.m., BellSouth FastAccess/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Modern Jazz

Drummer and Louisiana native Sebastian recently returned home after a long stint in New York, where he established himself as one of contemporary jazz's finest drummers. Sebastian has played with the likes of Jaco Pastorius, Harry Belafonte and John Scofield. Sebastian writes diverse and rhythmically challenging material as a bandleader, evidenced by his superb 2001 CD, The Spirit Within.

Ya Ya Sol

11:30 a.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Latin

This New Orleans rhythmic ensemble is led by guitarist Juan Josse, and offers world grooves with Crescent City underpinnings. Hart McNee's flute adds a mystical touch to Ya Ya Sol's exotic soundscape.

Southern Gospel Singers

11:45 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This longtime New Orleans favorite always electrifies the Gospel Tent with its heavenly delivery and rock-solid vocal timing.

Lesa Cormier, August Broussard & the Sundown Playboys

12:25 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Cajun

Drummer/vocalist Cormier has been playing Cajun music for more than a half-century, having started in his dad's band in 1947. Known for their 1970s regional hit "Saturday Night Special" (which enjoyed a worldwide release by the Beatles' Apple Records label), the Playboys stick to traditional Cajun music with a country tinge, with August Broussard ably covering accordion duties.

Andrew Hall's Society Brass Band

12:30 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

The name may imply an Uptown sensibility, but drummer Andrew Hall's band favors the traditional brass band sound pioneered by the Olympia and Eureka brass bands. For dirges and hymns played the way they were on the streets 50 years ago, this is a can't-miss set --the Society Brass Band has been playing in this style since 1967.

Hazel & the Delta Ramblers

12:30 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Folk/Bluegrass

Led by longtime WWOZ DJ and mandolinist Hazel Schlueter, the Delta Ramblers have graced Jazz Fest with their old-time country and bluegrass sounds since 1977. Every band member plays an acoustic instrument and sings lead and harmony vocals for a continuously fresh mix.

J. Monque'D Blues Band

12:30 p.m., Blues Stage, Blues

Blues harp man J. Monque'D plays a mix of classic Chicago deep blues and swampy Louisiana blues, delivered with a husky vocal growl. His band usually features some of New Orleans' best blues sidemen, mixing up classics with selections from Monque'D's CDs, including his latest effort, Chitlin' Eatin' Music.

Mount Pilgrim Baptist Church Choir

12:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

The Zion Harmonizers' Sherman Washington considers this choir one of the finest in New Orleans. Need we say more?

M.Q. 20/20 featuring Maurice Brown & Quamon Fowler

12:35 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Modern Jazz

Texas tenor saxophonist Quamon Fowler and Chicago trumpeter Maurice Brown are two of the rising young stars on the contemporary jazz scene; they're both in their early 20s and already turning heads with their sizzling bebop playing; they promise some serious soloing and musical dialogue in this set.

Irene Sage

12:35 p.m., Acura Stage, Rock

Vocalist Sage has a commanding stage presence, honed from years of late-night gigs at Checkpoint Charlie as the lead singer for now-defunct New Orleans rockers Irene and the Mikes. Sage recently released her first solo CD, Come On In, a mix of rock- and R&B-influenced songs, and is releasing a new live CD in time for Jazz Fest.

Butch Mudbone

12:45 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

Blues guitarist Butch Mudbone has the perfect name for the genre, and he's traveled far and wide, playing for dollars from strangers with his amp and guitar. This blues nomad has also recorded his own fair share of original material on his CDs.

Los Sagitarios

12:50 p.m., Congo Square Stage, World

This veteran Latin party band returns to the Jazz Fest lineup for the first time in three years. The 14-piece band includes three percussionists, a full horn section, and three singers playing all sorts of Latin styles as well as American pop.

Allison Collins Band

1 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Rock

Singer and LSU graduate Collins is somewhat reminiscent of Alanis Morrissette and plays a similar, though less angry, brand of hook-filled rock. Her latest album, Good Tree, has been a solid hit on the Baton Rouge college circuit.

First Revolution

1:15 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This a cappella quartet specializes in traditional hymns and spirituals.

Hawk Henries

1:30 p.m. & 4 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

Flute player Henries plays his own handmade flutes and is a regular performer at Native American pow wows throughout the Northeast.

Evening Star String Band

1:35 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Folk

The Evening Star String Band plays early country music, focusing on 1930s and '40s era classics, with plenty of terrific dobro and fiddle playing. The band is a frequent performer at the Piney Woods Opry, the monthly live radio program in Abita Springs.

James Andrews

1:40 p.m., Blues Stage, R&B/Traditional Jazz

Nicknamed "Satchmo of the Ghetto," New Orleans trumpeter James Andrews gives infectious performances of classics like "St. James Infirmary," delivered with Andrews' unmistakable vocal rasp and down-home playing. He usually sprinkles some traditional R&B into his sets, too, as it's in his bloodlines: the late Jessie Hill was Andrews' uncle.

CRITIC'S PICK

John Boutte

1:40 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Modern Jazz

Vocalist Boutte is one of New Orleans' treasures, capable of singing anything from jazz standards, R&B, gospel, and even country (he collaborates with local country/bluegrass outfit Uptown Okra) with passion and drama. Boutte was also the featured vocalist on the recent Mardi Gras Mambo, the album collaboration between Cubanismo and a host of New Orleans musicians.

Micaela y Fiesta Flamenca

1:40 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Flamenco

This flamenco company with eight dancers features the superb guitar work of former Stavin' Chain six-stringer John Lawrence, and Los Vecinos percussionist Michael Skinkus is a frequent contributor.

Louis Ford & his New Orleans Dixieland Flares

1:40 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

Clarinetist Ford is a versatile player, having played R&B with esteemed vocalists Aretha Franklin, Johnny Adams and Ruth Brown and traditional and contemporary jazz as a member of Harry Connick Jr.'s band. The classic Dixieland sound is on tap today, but don't be surprised to hear a bluesier, modern edge to his playing.

St. Maria Goretti Gospel Choir

2 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This large choir based in eastern New Orleans makes its Jazz Fest debut this year, with a wide range of gospel styles on tap.

Clarence "Frogman" Henry

2:05 p.m., Congo Square Stage, R&B

New Orleans R&B pioneer Clarence "Frogman" Henry cut two timeless singles, the novelty hit "Ain't Got No Home" -- featuring his trademark frog sounds -- and the aw-shucks ballad "But I Do." Henry's still active and a beloved figure in New Orleans; last week he won the Music Heritage Award at the 2002 Big Easy Awards.

Los Hombres Calientes

2:05 p.m., Acura Stage, Contemporary Jazz

Led by esteemed Headhunters percussionist Bill Summers and trumpeter Irvin Mayfield, Los Hombres Calientes has taken their brand of contemporary jazz spiced with international rhythms across the country. Their recent third album, New Congo Square -- recorded in multiple locales including Cuba -- was nominated for a Grammy award.

Charmaine Neville Band with Reggie Houston & Amasa Miller

2:25 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, R&B/Jazz

Vocalist Neville -- Charles Neville's daughter -- sings a mixture of jazz and R&B, backed by her longtime bandmates Reggie Houston on saxophone and Amasa Miller on piano. Her most recent album, Queen of the Mardi Gras, reflects her love for her hometown, and her long-running Monday night performances at Snug Harbor continue to draw packed houses.

The Golden Wings

2:45 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

The Golden Wings are one of New Orleans' oldest gospel ensembles, spreading the word for more than four decades. Formerly known as the Sensational Trumpets of Joy, they carry the mantle of traditional gospel with passionate performances.

Kerry Grombacher

2:50 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Country/Folk

Guitarist and mandolinist Grombacher writes, sings and plays original songs that nod to vintage country and cowboy music and themes, as well as contemporary ballads. He recently released his second CD, Sands Motel.

007

2:55 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Reggae

Named for Desmond Dekker's 1967 rude boy anthem, 007 plays covers from Jamaica's late-60s rocksteady heyday. The essential link between ska and reggae, the sub-genre -- spawned when New Orleans R&B reached Jamaican musicians via radio airwaves -- features treasured ditties about good times, romance and the politics of freedom.

Chris Clifton

2:55 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

Trumpeter Chris Clifton is one of the many trumpeters carrying on Louis Armstrong's legacy, but Clifton has a direct connection to Satchmo. Clifton was a longtime friend of Armstrong's and played in the band of Armstrong's wife, Lil' Hardin, in the late '50s. Clifton also recorded a tribute album to Armstrong, titled Memories of a Friend.

Sherman Robertson

2:55 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Guitarslinger and Louisiana native Sherman Robertson is a favorite on the contemporary blues circuit, thanks to his driving blues-rock solos and energetic live shows. (Robertson learned his trade playing with zydeco legend Clifton Chenier.) He currently records for respected Chicago blues label Alligator Records.

Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers

2:55 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Traditional Jazz

New Orleans icon Ruffins is a tireless performer who's rightfully drawn comparisons to Louis Armstrong with his hot trumpet playing and joyous disposition. After leaving ReBirth Brass Band for a solo career, Ruffins has made consistently entertaining albums, including his latest, 2001's 1533 St. Philip St. And no other performer draws such packed houses at his regular gigs at diverse venues like Vaughan's and Le Bon Temps Roule.

Nation of Change

3:20 p.m., Congo Square Stage, Native American

The Nation of Change presents a wide spectrum of Native American dances, including both men's and women's traditional movements: fancy dance, women's fancy shawl, grass dance and hoop dance. The dances are set to flute playing and powwow drumming.

Sarah T. Reed Gospel Choir

3:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Culled from its namesake New Orleans high school, this student choir sings everything from spirituals and contemporary jazz to pop songs.

Gov't Mule

3:45 p.m., Acura Stage, Rock/Blues

Led by Southern rock guitar prince Warren Haynes, the Mule is an Allman Brothers Band spin-off that originated in the mid-90s jam band explosion. The psychedelic jam-rock power trio has incorporated just about every bassist on the jam circuit since Allen Woody (also of the Allman Brothers) died in 2000. This performance features Widespread Panic bassist Dave Schools, and the band will feature songs from its tribute to Woody, The Deep End, Vol. 1.

CRITIC'S PICK

Jon Cleary & the Absolute Monster Gentlemen

3:55 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Funk/R&B

Piano man Cleary is a native of England who's become one of New Orleans' distinguished piano players over the last decade, and his band plays a superb mix of funk, R&B, soul and blues. Cleary's just released his eponymously titled third album, which captures the sophisticated and explosive sound of his live shows. He's also known as a sideman and currently mans the piano chair in Bonnie Raitt's band.

Earl King & the Butanes

4:10 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues/R&B

Even if you've never heard of Earl King, you've heard him. King is the author of such classic songs as "Come On" (covered by the likes of Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan), "Trick Bag" and "Lonely, Lonely Nights." He also recorded a fine string of contemporary blues albums for Black Top Records in the '90s, spotlighting King's catchy songwriting and spiked guitar work.

Leah Chase

4:15 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Modern Jazz

Jazz vocalist Chase sings in a deep, earthy voice perfectly suited for her renditions of jazz standards. Last year she released the CD At Last, a stellar representation of her talent, and did a brilliant guest turn on pianist Matt Lemmler's Portraits of Wonder album, recasting "I Just Called to Say I Love You" as a haunting ballad.

Lyle Henderson

4:15 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Vocalist Henderson is a fixture in the local gospel community, having performed with artists such as Marva Wright and Davell Crawford and ensembles like the Gospel Soul Children. He's also sung with Terence Blanchard and brings charisma and a powerful voice to his live performances.

Roderick Paulin & the Groovers

4:15 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Funk/R&B

The son of New Orleans brass band legend Doc Paulin, saxophonist Roderick Paulin grew up in the brass band tradition, playing with both traditional outfits and contemporary bands like ReBirth Brass Band. On his 1999 debut CD, RPM, Paulin shows his affinity for funk and R&B, with snappy original compositions and diverse covers ranging from "Georgia on My Mind" to Marvin Gaye's "What's Going On."

Basin Brothers

4:20 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Cajun

The eponymous basin is actually the Atchafalaya Basin, the body of water in south Louisiana that defines the life for Cajuns like Al Berard, the fiddler and frontman of the Basin Brothers. Berard is an accomplished musician, songwriter and chef and has produced albums for other Cajun bands. Expect songs from last year's self-produced Deux Violins, which offered a selection of fiddle reels and jigs in the style of Cajun masters such as Dennis McGee.

Walter Payton & Snapbeans

4:20 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz/R&B

Bassist Payton is the father of acclaimed trumpeter Nicholas Payton, and it's easy to see where Nicholas' talent springs from. His father is a graceful and accomplished musician and bandleader whose repertoire is a virtual textbook of New Orleans jazz and R&B.

The Revealers

4:30 p.m., Congo Square Stage, Reggae

A collection of multi-talented instrumentalists, singers and songwriters, the Revealers delivers a highly energetic reggae-based mix, incorporating influences from Marley to Mahalia. An ever-growing regional fan base crowds into shows at Cafe Brasil, and the band is a resident standby opener for touring reggae acts like Burning Spear and Third World.

CRITIC'S PICK

The Blind Boys of Alabama featuring Clarence Fountain

5:05 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Since they started singing together in the male chorus at Talladega Institute for the Blind in Alabama, Clarence Fountain and his vocal partners have been a mainstay of the gospel scene and one of the few gospel groups to cross over to secular audiences. Their popularity is at an all-time high currently; the band just won a Grammy for its recent CD Spirit of the Century, where members were backed by David Lindley, John Hammond and Charlie Musselwhite and wrapped their glorious harmonies around songs by the likes of Tom Waits.

CRITIC'S PICK

Ralph Stanley & the Clinch Mountain Boys

5:35 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Stage, Bluegrass

Playing one of the most highly anticipated sets at this year's Jazz Fest is Dr. Ralph Stanley, a Virginia-born and -based bluegrass legend now finding new fans through his association with the O Brother, Where Art Thou? phenomenon. Considered one of the finest banjo pickers and tenor vocalists that bluegrass has ever produced, Stanley first gained fame as one-half of the renowned Stanley Brothers; when brother Carter Stanley passed away, Ralph became frontman, and he now performs with his son, Ralph II, in the band.

Blues Traveler

5:40, Acura Stage, Rock

With jam band icon John Popper at the helm, harmonica-heavy Blues Traveler is a testament to the potential for pop rock appeal among roots-minded bands. A major player in the mid-90s jam band renaissance, BT hit it big in the commercial world with its 1994 album Four and the catchy single "Runaround." The band has since retreated from the pop spotlight, but last year's album, Bridge -- their first without late bass player and New Orleans resident Bobby Sheehan -- displayed a renewed sense of vigor.

Delbert McClinton

5:40 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Roadhouse belter Delbert McClinton has a voice that keeps getting better with age, its rough edges getting right to the grit of songs like "Livin' it Down," the rough-and-tumble lead track from his last album, Nothing Personal. McClinton's been burning up honky-tonks and nightclubs since the '60s, torching country, blues and R&B-infused songs with his honey-and-sandpaper voice.

CRITIC'S PICK

Charles Mingus 80th Birthday Tribute Orchestra

5:40 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Modern Jazz

This superb collection of New York musicians honors the legacy of legendary jazz bassist and composer Charles Mingus, often spotlighting Mingus' appreciation for classical music.

Banu Gibson & New Orleans Hot Jazz with Fayard Nicholas

5:45 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

Vocalist Gibson is full of sass and class, just the right mix for her repertoire of '20s hot jazz and '30s- and 40s-era swing. Her six-piece band welcomes 87-year-old special guest Fayard Nicholas today; Nicholas was part of the Nicholas Brothers dance team at the Cotton Club in Harlem, and appeared on Broadway numerous times with such luminaries as Bob Hope and Josephine Baker.

Irie Dawtas

5:45 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Reggae

The Irie Dawtas play a New Orleans brand of reggae mixed with R&B for a highly energetic, uplifting show. With a repertoire comprised mostly of original songs (though they do draw from the songbooks of Marley and Banton), the Dawtas focus on the creator, putting forth a positive message of unity.

Horace Trahan

Noon, Congo Square Stage; 5:50 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Cajun

Horace Trahan is a true southwest Louisiana paradox. He first gained fame as a teenage neo-traditionalist Cajun accordionist and singer, then abruptly switched gears to front a zydeco band -- covering songs by Boozoo Chavis and John Delafose -- and delivered his own local hit "High School Breakdown," based on a school marching band drumbeat. But he's no mere chameleon: he plays all his music with unparalleled passion and talent.

Coolie Family

6:05 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This Slidell-based group showed its power on its 1999 CD, Try Jesus, which features soul and R&B horn charts supplementing its glorious harmonies.

King Floyd

6 p.m., Congo Square Stage, Soul/Funk

Groove us, please. Best known for "Groove Me," his timeless mid-70s funk anthem, Floyd also waxed a number of less well known but equally stirring soul numbers, including "Baby, Let Me Kiss You," "I Feel Like Dynamite," and a smoking version of Otis Redding's "Hard to Handle."

FRIDAY, MAY 3

Today's Parades:

11:25 a.m. Algiers Steppers SAPCs (Economy Hall)

2 p.m. Double Nine Highsteppers , Millennium Steppers and Single Men Kids SAPCs with New Wave Brass Band

4 p.m. Young Men 2 Old Men Legends, New Generation and Nandi Exclusive SAPCs with Real Untouchables Brass Band

Jerusalem Baptist Church Choir

11 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This choir's strong, unified vocals are a perfect start to the day.

Semolian Warriors Mardi Gras Indians

11:10 a.m., Blues Tent, Mardi Gras Indian

Hailing from Uptown, this tribe is led by Big Chief James Harris and should kick off the Blues Tent lineup today with some fancy featherwork and traditional chanting.

Kumbuka Drum & Dance Collective

11:15 a.m., Congo Square Stage, World

New Orleans' Kumbuka African Drum & Dance Collective has been together for more than two decades, and is dedicated to the preservation and presentation of traditional African and African-American culture through drumming, dancing and singing.

Elaine Townsend

11:20 a.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Folk

Singer-songwriter Townsend is a South Carolina native who's made waves on the Southern touring circuit, earning acclaim with her bluesy voice and original songs. In 2000 she released a live CD, Redemption, which shows her incorporating funk and Latin rhythms into her sound.

Zion

11:20 a.m., Acura Stage, Reggae

This all-female New Orleans reggae band blends its exquisite harmonies with classic Jamaican rhythms and is making its mark on the local reggae scene; Zion was nominated in the Best World/Reggae Group category of the 2002 Big Easy Entertainment Awards.

Doc Paulin's Dixieland Jazz Band

11:25 a.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

Ninety-four-year-old trumpeter Paulin is a living history book of traditional New Orleans jazz -- and his children are helping carry on the legacy. Six of Paulin's sons are in his band, and this is a chance to see New Orleans' famed musical heritage played by two generations of esteemed local jazzmen.

Delgado Jazz Ensemble

11:30 a.m., Lagniappe Stage, Contemporary Jazz

Hear the cream of the crop of students in this local community college's jazz studies program.

Hawk Henries

11:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Native American Village Stage, Native American

Flute player Henries plays his own handmade flutes and is a regular performer at Native American powwows throughout the Northeast.

Loyola University Jazz Band

11:30 a.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Contemporary Jazz

This big band is under the direction of trombonist and pianist John Mahoney, known not only for his two decades-plus as director of jazz studies at the university, but also for his regular Wednesday night gigs at Snug Harbor. Expect standards and some of Mahoney's original works.

Ed Perkins Group

11:40 a.m., BellSouth FastAccess/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

Vocalist Perkins has led a diverse career, studying under Alvin Batiste at Southern University and going on to open for such prestigious performers as Donnie Hathaway, Stanley Turrentine, Abbey Lincoln and Max Roach. Expect a healthy dose of standards in this set.

The Dynamic Smooth Family

11:45 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Backed by a full band, this Slidell-based ensemble praises the heavens with faithful versions of traditional gospel favorites.

Henry Gray & the Cats

12:15 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Blues piano legend Henry Gray manned the ivories for Howlin' Wolf, Little Walter, Elmore James and a host of other blues royalty. Baton Rouge-based Gray still maintains an active recording and touring schedule, and his most recent album is 2001's Henry Gray Plays Chicago Blues. He also won Best Blues Artist at the 2002 Big Easy Entertainment Awards.

Chucky C. and Clearly Blue

12:25 p.m., Congo Square Stage, R&B

Multi-instrumentalist Chucky C. knows his way around tenor, alto and soprano saxophones and can also switch to flute, clarinet, harmonica and piano. He's a solid vocalist, too, and applies his deep voice to a wide range of material from jazz and R&B to Dixieland and blues. Chucky C. released his debut solo CD, Clearly Blues, in 2001.

Kim Carson & the Casualties

12:30 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Country

Country chanteuse Carson keeps the honky-tonk flames burning in New Orleans, thanks to the light twang in her voice and a solid roadhouse-style band. Her latest CD is titled Calle de Orleans.

June Gardner & the Fellows

12:35 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Jazz/R&B

In the long line of distinguished New Orleans drummers, June Gardner still stands out. His diverse recording credits include Roy Brown, Sam Cooke, Dave Bartholomew and Lionel Hampton, and like his session work, his live shows are a superb mix of jazz, R&B and New Orleans staples.

Leviticus Gospel Singers

12:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Betty McKinnis leads this traditional gospel group and perennial Gospel Tent performers.

Patrice Fisher & Arpa with spec. guests Graciela Barretto & 4 Cuerdas of Venezuela

12:35 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, World

Latin jazz harpist Patrice Fisher boasts a 10-album catalog of original music and an illustrious history of international touring. Her local Latin band Arpa will share the stage with Cuatro Cuerdas, a young Venezuelan group dedicated to its country's traditional music that recently expanded to include three singers and four dancers. Latin American folk singer Graciela Barreto will join the ensemble.

Nation of Change

12:35 p.m., Acura Stage; 2 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

The Nation of Change presents a wide spectrum of Native American dances, including both men's and women's traditional movements: fancy dance, women's fancy shawl, grass dance and hoop dance. The dances are set to flute playing and powwow drumming.

Dash Rip Rock

12:45 p.m. & 3:15 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Rock

We know, they've trimmed their name to just Dash, but we can't let go of the moniker of Louisiana's signature bar-band rockers just yet. Dash's hybrid brand of intense cow-punk predated the whole no-depression movement, and Dash always packs a hell of a bite in its live show. Sonic Boom is the band's latest CD, a nicely crafted album that showcases leader Bill Davis' songwriting.

Otter Trail Singers

12:45 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

New York is home base for this ensemble, which often travels and performs at Native American gatherings across the country.

Jeremy Davenport

1:05 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess/WWOZ Jazz Tent

Trumpeter and crooner Jeremy Davenport is often compared to Chet Baker, thanks to his mellow vocals and superb trumpet playing. The St. Louis native studied with Wynton and Ellis Marsalis and toured with Harry Connick Jr. Davenport's often found these days at his regular gig at The Ritz-Carlton Hotel's French Quarter Bar. His most recent CD is 1998's Maybe in a Dream.

Unstoppable Gospel Creators Singers

1:15 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This seven-piece band from New Orleans offers a blend of traditional and contemporary gospel.

Tab Benoit

1:25 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Houma bluesman Benoit just released Wetlands, his best album to date. The CD finds Benoit paying homage to his Louisiana roots with loose, infectious versions of local classics like Lil' Bob & the Lollipop's "I Got Loaded," which showcase Benoit's syncopated guitar playing and rough-around-the-edges vocals to great effect.

Dineh Tah Native Dancers

1:35 p.m., Congo Square Stage; 5:45 p.m. Native American Village Stage, Native American

Representing the Navajo (or Dineh) Nation, Dineh Tah is a young mix of male and female dancers performing their tribe's native rituals.

CRITIC'S PICK

Bruce Daigrepont Cajun Band

1:40 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Cajun

A hot accordion player with rich tenor vocals, Daigrepont has legions of local fans who followed him through the years from a long-running weekly gig at the Maple Leaf Bar to Tipitina's, where he still performs a popular fais do do at 5 p.m. on most Sundays. Daigrepont, this year's Cajun music Big Easy Entertainment Awards winner, will be featured next week as part of New Orleans Mayor-elect Ray Nagin's inauguration ceremonies. Look for local folk musician Gina Forsyth at his side on fiddle.

Sherman

1:45 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Rock

New York-based singer/songwriter/guitarist Sherman runs in the same musical circles as like-minded acts like Widespread Panic and the Spin Doctors, and you can expect some of the musicians from those bands at his set today. Funky keyboardist Ivan Neville also plays with Sherman at opportune times.

Jon Seiger & the Allstars

1:45 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional jazz

Bandleader Seiger sings and plays piano and trumpet, an impressive feat considering that he's deaf. What's even more remarkable is Seiger's considerable skills have earned him time on the bandstand with notables such as Doc Cheatham, Maynard Ferguson and Louis Armstrong alumni Arvell Shaw. The New York-based Shaw is particularly fond of New Orleans jazz and Louis Armstrong material.

Wayne Toups & the Zydecajuns

1:50 p.m., Acura Stage, Rock/Cajun

A native of Crowley, Toups has enjoyed crossover success as a session accordionist (he plays on hits by Alan Jackson and others) and he performs a Southern rock-drenched Cajun style with nods to the Allman Brothers. His most recent album Little Wooden Box also includes plenty of old-style French tunes. Still, nobody squeezes a power chord from an accordion quite like Toups, whose stage presence even earned him the nickname Le Boss.

New Zion Trio Plus One

2 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

It's actually five, not four singers who are Gospel Tent regulars, and they've brought their blend of traditional and contemporary gospel to Jazz Fest for more than a decade.

Leo Nocentelli

2:20 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Funk

The original guitarist for the Meters will forever be associated with the biting, syncopated licks he crafted on classic Meters instrumentals like "Cissy Strut" and "Funky Miracle," and the power chords of "Africa." Nocentelli always includes healthy doses of Meters material in his sets, as well as recent original material that leans more toward jazzy, improvisational rock.

Irvin Mayfield

2:25 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

Trumpeter Mayfield has made the biggest splash in recent years as the co-leader of Los Hombres Calientes, the New Orleans contemporary jazz and world rhythms juggernaut. But Mayfield also has an active solo career and records for New Orleans' Basin Street record label. His most recent album is How Passion Falls, which spotlights Mayfield's ballad playing, but he can burn on bop, too.

Henry Butler

2:45 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Dazzling pianist Butler remains one of New Orleans' most eclectic artists, effortlessly jumping from jazz, funk, R&B, classical, blues and ragtime -- sometimes all in the same solo. The latest example of Butler's musical wanderlust is his new CD, The Game Has Just Begun, which features Butler experimenting with New Age-style keyboard sounds, and includes an unexpected cover of the Doors' "Riders on the Storm."

Jean Knight

2:45 p.m., Congo Square Stage, R&B

As one of Stax Records' artists in the '70s, New Orleans' Jean Knight hit the motherlode with "Mr. Big Stuff," the irresistible funky single (arranged by Wardell Quezergue) that ranks as one of Stax's all-time biggest sellers. Knight still sings R&B and soul classics, but also incorporates more contemporary urban R&B sounds on her recent albums. Her live shows are often filled with covers.

Praise Community Choir

2:45 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This New Orleans choir has been together for nearly a decade and sings mostly original gospel material. Jesus, He's Going to Wipe is the title of the ensemble's recent self-produced CD.

Feufollet

2:55 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Cajun

Dressed in baggy jeans and the occasional backward baseball cap, these six teenagers don't exactly look like one of the most exciting new Cajun bands on the scene. But that's exactly what Feufollet is. On last year's eponymous album produced by Steve Riley --a former Cajun boy genius himself -- Feufollet pays respects to Cajun masters new and old, from Dennis McGee to Dewey Balfa to Zachary Richard.

CRITIC'S PICK

Ingrid Lucia & the Flying Neutrinos

2:55 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

Jazzy vocalist Lucia sings torch songs with style and frequently turns to '40s and '50s swing songbooks to get things jumping. She has a distinctive voice that's drawn comparisons to Betty Boop, and the Flying Neutrinos are a superb backing band. Lucia's recorded a number of albums, and her new CD, Fortune, adds a touch of country to her repertoire of vintage American sounds.

Charles Neville Quintet

3 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Contemporary Jazz

The funky saxophonist of the Neville Brothers has always been a jazzman at heart. His playing ranges from the bluesy side of Charlie Parker to Native American melodies, and standards like "Summertime" and "Stella by Starlight." Neville recently released his third solo album, titled The Painter.

CRITIC'S PICK

Marcia Ball

3:25 p.m., Acura Stage, R&B

The Gulf South piano queen may live in Texas, but she's still a Louisiana girl. From Professor Longhair rhythms to R&B and swamp-pop triplets, Ball's work on the 88s is quintessential Louisiana boogie. She can also crank out roadhouse blues and country-inflected ballads, which she did on her most recent CD, 2001's Presumed Innocent.

The Banks Family

3:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Violet, La., is home to this family ensemble, which sings a mixture of traditional and contemporary gospel and some quartet-style harmonies. They've been performing together for more than three decades.

CRITIC'S PICK

Donald Harrison Jr. Quintet

3:50 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

Saxophonist Harrison is one of New Orleans' creative visionaries, consistently blurring genres and incorporating diverse styles into his brand of "nouveau swing." His tenure in Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers is evidence of his hard bop powers, but Harrison's New Orleans roots are always evident in his work -- especially in the Mardi Gras Indian rhythms he learned from his father, the late Big Chief of the Guardians of the Flame. Harrison's new CD, The New Sounds of Mardi Gras, draws heavily on that inspiration.

CRITIC'S PICK

Dirty Dozen Brass Band

3:55 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Brass Band

The Dirty Dozen is the band that opened up the New Orleans brass band tradition to contemporary influences, mixing in R&B, bebop, hip-hop, and world rhythms into their sound, and paving the way for bands like ReBirth and the Soul Rebels. Hard to believe, but the band's celebrating its 25th anniversary this year and is commemorating the occasion with Medicated Magic, a new CD that pays tribute to their New Orleans roots through covers of classics like the Meters' "Cissy Strut."

CRITIC'S PICK

Oliver Mtukudzi & Black Spirits of Zimbabwe

4:05 p.m., Congo Square Stage, World

One of the giants of contemporary African music, Oliver Mtukudzi (called "Tuku" for short) has won international popularity with his contagious fusion of pop and indigenous African styles like chimurenga, mbaqanga and korekore, with hopeful lyrics of political, social and economic issues. His music has been a constant inspiration for Bonnie Raitt, who repeatedly proclaims her admiration for Tuku.

Lonnie Brooks

4:10 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Louisiana native Brooks remains one of the most compelling guitarists on the contemporary blues scene, thanks to the diverse influences in his playing. Brooks cut his teeth playing with zydeco legend Clifton Chenier, toured with soul master Sam Cooke, and scored a regional hit with the Gulf Coast boogie classic "Family Rules." After moving to Chicago, Brooks nailed the deep blues tradition and has incorporated funk and rock into his approach, too. All his CDs for Alligator Records are terrific showcases of his talent.

Greater Antioch Music Ministry

4:15 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This New Orleans ensemble is known for its rich harmonies.

Jude Taylor & his Burning Flames

4:20 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Zydeco

Grand Coteau Jude Taylor's roots in the blues are evident in his zydeco. His taste for jump blues echoes the music of zydeco king Clifton Chenier, and Taylor will likely be playing a number of Chenier classics in his set. On his recordings for the local Mardi Gras label, Taylor has tackled everything from B.B. King to a zydeco version of the macarena.

New Orleans Ragtime Orchestra

4:15 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent

This band is dedicated to the works of early jazz giants, and plays material from piano legend Jelly Roll Morton and ragtime icon Scott Joplin, as well as lesser known but highly influential pioneers like Armand Piron.

Mike Younger

4:25 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Folk

Singer/songwriter/guitarist Younger is a former New Orleans street musician whose demo tape caught the attention of Rodney Crowell, inspiring Crowell to produce Younger's superb debut CD, Something in the Air. Younger's original songs and rack-harp playing recall 60s-era acoustic Bob Dylan, and Younger's recently been working with Memphis music icon and producer Jim Dickinson.

Bill Miller

4:30 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

Miller's brand of Native American rock 'n' roll has earned him some noteworthy fans and collaborators, including Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder and contemporary songstress Tori Amos.

CRITIC'S PICK

Liz McComb

5:05 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Gospel singer McComb calls Paris home, but she feels a deep attachment to New Orleans and the work of gospel pioneer Mahalia Jackson. She recently recorded an album titled Spirit of New Orleans, a tribute to Jackson that she'll draw from for this stirring performance.

Bonnie Raitt

5:25 p.m. Acura Stage, Rock/Blues

Champion of girl-rockers everywhere, Bonnie Raitt was a late bloomer commercially, but now her strong voice and bluesy slide guitar are an instantly recognizable force in pop music. Her latest album Silver Lining measures up to her hit albums from the '90s, thanks in part to New Orleans pianist Jon Cleary, who is a frequent collaborator and fixture in her backup band.

Karl Denson's Tiny Universe

5:30 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Jazz/Funk

He rode Lenny Kravitz's coattails to commercial rock success, but since 1992, reedman Karl "Diesel" Denson has embedded himself in the West Coast jazz-funk craze. A founding member of San Diego's groove supergroup the Greyboy Allstars, Denson formed his own Tiny Universe after the Greyboys split in 1998. One of the hottest live acts on the jam band circuit, KDTU signed with Blue Note, releasing Dance Lesson #2 last year.

The Yellowjackets

5:30 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

The Yellowjackets are the jazz equivalent of the Allman Brothers, surviving and embracing numerous line-up changes to remain one of the most recognizable names on the contemporary jazz scene. Originally formed as a backing band for noted blues guitarist Robben Ford, the Yellowjackets have played fusion, world beat-influenced jazz, quieter acoustic material and everything between, and this set promises a primer on their 25-year history.

CRITIC'S PICK

Deacon John

5:45 p.m., Blues Tent, R&B/Blues

New Orleans legend Deacon John is one of the greatest torchbearers of the traditional New Orleans R&B sound, but he's equally nimble with Elmore James-style slide blues, big band arrangements, and soul ballads. John recently recorded the forthcoming live album Deacon John's Jump Blues, which features longtime friends and collaborators like Aaron Neville and Dr. John guesting on a program of New Orleans classics.

Cyril Neville & the Uptown All-Stars

5:45 p.m., Congo Square Stage, Reggae/Funk

Billed as the world's only "second-line reggae band," Cyril Neville's Uptown All-Stars blends Jamaican reggae with New Orleans rhythms, for a socially and politically conscious sound that's eminently danceable. If you think you've heard every version of "Big Chief," wait until you hear Neville's incredibly funky version with this band.

CRITIC'S PICK

Sean Ardoin n' Zydekool

5:50 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Zydeco

With last year's acclaimed, innovative album Pullin' -- released on Buckwheat Zydeco's Tomorrow Recordings label -- Sean Ardoin made it clear that he's more than ready to leave his drums behind to become the latest accordion-wielding Ardoin. He fronts the hottest new band in zydeco, combining a funky, contemporary approach with dance floor-tested grooves and get-the-party-going vocals.

CRITIC'S PICK

Michael White & the Original Liberty Jazz Band with guest Thais Clark

5:45 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

Clarinetist White is one of the most respected names in New Orleans traditional jazz, a man who honors the influence of giants like Sidney Bechet and George Lewis while creating his own legacy. White just released a new CD titled The Soul of New Orleans Jazz, featuring Afro-Caribbean sounds, spirituals and standards.

Joe Krown Organ Combo

5:50 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, R&B/Funk

Keyboardist Krown makes greasy Hammond B-3 grooves reminiscent of Booker T. & the MGs and Jimmy Smith, filtered through a New Orleans aesthetic that nods to the legacy of funkmaster Art Neville. Krown's not just an imitator, though, as he writes tight, original compositions that also spotlight saxophonist Brent Rose and guitarist John Fohl, as heard on his new CD, Funk Yard.

CRITIC'S PICK

McDonogh #35 Gospel Choir

6:05 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

One of the best high school choirs in New Orleans, McDonogh #35 has earned the prestigious closing set at today's Gospel Tent.

SATURDAY, MAY 4

Today's Parades:

Noon Dumaine St. Gang, Dumaine St. Ladies and Original Big Seven SAPCs with Pinettes Brass Band

1 p.m. White Cloud Hunters, Cherokee Hunters and New Orleans Rhythm Mardi Gras Indians

1:35 p.m. Nine Time Ladies SAPC (Economy Hall Tent)

2 p.m. Pigeon Town Steppers, N'Krumah Better Boys and Divine Ladies SAPCs with NewBirth Brass Band

3 p.m. Indians of the Nation, Bayou Renegades and Black Eagles Mardi Gras Indians

4 p.m. Second Line Jammers, Black Men of Labor and Happy House SAPCs with Treme Brass Band

Wimberly Family

11 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This seven-member family group formed in New Orleans in 1975, and have incorporated contemporary gospel sounds into their solid traditional gospel background.

Rebecca Barry and Bill Huntington

11:15 a.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

After studying with sax titan Ed Petersen and pianist Ellis Marsalis at the University of New Orleans, saxophonist Barry is blossoming into one of the most tenacious young jazz players in the New Orleans jazz scene. Her collaboration with veteran bassist Bill Huntington is proof of her talent; last year the duo released the CD Line for Lion, which Huntington produced. The title, incidentally, was inspired by swing-era DJ Jimmy Lyon and New Orleans' City Park.

Golden Star Hunters Mardi Gras Indians

11:15 a.m., Blues Tent, Mardi Gras Indian

This venerable Mardi Gras Indian gang is led by Big Chief Larry Bannock, the revered figure in the Mardi Gras Indian community who's led the Golden Star Hunters since 1979.

SUBR Jazz Ensemble

11:15 a.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage

Influential jazzman and Louisiana clarinetist Alvin Batiste has led SUBR's Jazz Studies program since 1969, making this annual performance of SUBR students a prime spot to hear up-and-coming talent.

Jamal Batiste & the Jam-Allstars

11:20 a.m., Acura Stage, Funk

Another talented member of the Batiste family, young drummer Jamal Batiste leads a funk combo that also incorporates touches of hip-hop, R&B and jazz into the mix.

Humphrey Davis Jr. & Nightlife

11:20 a.m., Lagniappe Stage, Jazz/R&B

Saxophonist Davis is the son of bassist Stewart Davis Sr., who performed with such New Orleans legends as Papa Celestin and Danny Barker. Following in the family tradition, he's leans more toward R&B than jazz, and has played with Fats Domino, Dr. John, Irma Thomas and others. He recently released his debut CD, Dawn.

Joseph Torregano

11:20 a.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

Clarinetist and saxophonist Torregano is another in the long line of New Orleans musicians dedicated to teaching; Torregano's taught music in the New Orleans public school system for more than two decades, and his former students include Donald Harrison Jr. and Shannon Powell.

Rudy & His Caribbean Funk Band

11:20 a.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, World/Funk

Known as "Señor Gasolina" after his infectious flagship song, Rudy leads his band through dance-worthy ditties that present New Orleans as a northern extension of the Caribbean, mixing traditional island rhythms with New Orleans street beats.

Nation of Change

11:25 a.m., Congo Square Stage; 5:45 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

The Nation of Change presents a wide spectrum of Native American dances, including both men's and women's traditional movements: fancy dance, women's fancy shawl, grass dance and hoop dance. The dances are set to flute playing and powwow drumming.

Dineh Tah Navajo Dancers

11:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Native American Village Stage; 2 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Native American

This New Mexico-based ensemble has been performing since 1993, presenting traditional Navajo dances such as the Navajo Gourd dance and the Social Song and Dance.

Providence Baptist Church Male Chorus

11:45 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This 15-member ensemble from LaPlace has been singing traditional gospel filled with exquisite harmonies for more than a decade.

Myself

12:35 p.m., Congo Square Stage, Hip-hop

Reggae-rapper Myself, formerly known as Goldilocks, brings a pan-African sound collage to Jazz Fest. The dreadlocked local mixes dub trickery with straight-up urban hip-hop on his latest album, Rebel Souljah.

Big Al Carson

12:20 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Carson's booming voice and knowing take on blues standards and his own originals have made him a staple of the New Orleans Bourbon Street blues scene. Take Your Drunken Ass Home is the title of New Orleans bluesman Big Al Carson's CD, and if you actually have to contemplate taking that advice this early in the day, you're in for a long afternoon.

Theresa Andersson

12:25 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Funk/Pop

Vibrant Swedish-New Orleanian Theresa Andersson is a Jazz Fest and local favorite. With a stellar lineup of R&B and funk luminaries (including Neville Brothers guitarist Shane Theriot), she pumps a melange of Southern roots rock and rhythm-based styles, topped by her soul-drenched vocals. An accomplished violinist, Andersson also fiddles a mean solo. She recently released the CD No Regrets.

Original Dixieland Jazz Band

12:25 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

This traditional-minded ensemble has quite a legacy to uphold; it is often credited with recording the first jazz recording ever, in 1917. The current incarnation of the band is led by Jimmy LaRocca, grandson of band founder Nick LaRocca, and hews close to its original sound.

Earl Turbinton

12:25 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

New Orleans saxophonist Turbinton is one of the city's underappreciated virtuosos, a visionary musician who recorded with both Miles Davis and B.B. King, reflecting his accomplished jazz and blues playing. He's also an incendiary funk player, and his early-70s recordings with his brother Willie Tee in the Gaturs are New Orleans funk classics. Expect the unexpected.

CRITIC'S PICK

Hackberry Ramblers

12:30 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Cajun/Western Swing

The Hackberry Ramblers continue to perform the same border sounds of Louisiana Cajun and Texas swing that founding members Luderin Darbone and Edwin Duhon have been playing for seven -- that's right, seven -- decades. The band appeared on some of the earliest music shows on radio, and they've played live on MTV. Expect anything from waltzes to Cajun blues to Hawaiian tunes, with a little old-time rock 'n' roll for good measure.

John Lee & the Heralds of Christ

12:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

One of the longest-running New Orleans gospel groups, John Lee & the Heralds of Christ deliver the gospel quartet style with reverence and spirit.

Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews

12:35 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Traditional Jazz

Trombonist and trumpeter Troy Andrews --aka Trombone Shorty -- is the younger brother of trumpeter James Andrews, and is blossoming into an artist in his own right. At 16 years old, Andrews is making his presence felt on the local scene with his trad jazz, contemporary jazz, R&B, and New Orleans funk chops, and he's writing original songs, too.

Reggie Hall & the Twilighters

12:35 p.m., Acura Stage, R&B

Longtime Fats Domino associate Hall also plays piano and New Orleans R&B and always aims for that classic '50s sound in his live performances, which usually feature a stellar horn section.

Medicine Tail

12:45 p.m. & 3:15 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

Named for a pivotal spot and turning point in the Battle of Little Big Horn, this troupe honors its namesake with traditional Native American rituals performed with pride.

Pastor Ray Inglehart & Gloryland

1:15 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Baton Rouge-based Pastor Inglehart leads his choir through an array of gospel styles; he's a charismatic leader who also recorded his own solo CD in 2000.

Hawk Henries

1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

Flute player Henries plays his own handmade flutes and is a regular performer at Native American powwows throughout the Northeast.

Raful Neal Jr. with Oscar "Harpo" Davis

1:30 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Two Baton Rouge blues legends team up for this set, as harmonica giants Raful Neal and Oscar "Harpo" Davis engage in a good-natured harp cutting session. Neal is the patriarch of the esteemed Neal blues family, which includes son Kenny and daughter Jackie; he and Davis both mine the legacy of swamp bluesman Slim Harpo and Chicago giant Little Walter in their playing.

CRITIC'S PICK

Algiers Brass Band

1:35 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Brass Band

The late Danny Barker was a big fan of the Algiers Brass Band, which speaks volumes about their dedication to the traditional brass band style. Their CD Lord, Lord, Lord shows the band's prowess on dirges and spirituals, under the leadership of trumpeter and bandleader Ruddley Thibodeaux.

Alvin Batiste & Jazztronauts

1:35 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Modern Jazz

He's renowned as the director of jazz studies at SUNO, but here's where legendary clarinetist Alvin Batiste gets to show how he's inspired Louisiana jazz players for more than 30 years. Batiste has been playing compelling contemporary jazz since his collaborations with Harold Battiste and Ed Blackwell for AFO Records, and his original compositions reflect his wisdom.

Zigaboo Modeliste & the Funk Revue

1:40 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Funk

The indisputable "King of the Funky Drums," Zigaboo Modeliste's tenure with the Meters established him as one of the most influential drummers on the contemporary scene. He still funks it up hard with a souped-up drum kit and an outstanding band, performing Meters standards, covers and originals from his recent CD, Zigaboo.Com.

CRITIC'S PICK

The Bluerunners

1:45 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Rock/Cajun

South Louisiana's Bluerunners released one of the best albums of 2001, Le Grand Bleu, a wistful, proud tribute to their roots that mixed scalding rockers with waltzes and featured guest appearances from Michael Doucet and Sonny Landreth. In its live performances, the band tempers a punk rock energy with a reverence for Cajun music traditions.

CRITIC'S PICK

Lloyd Price

1:55 p.m., Acura Stage, R&B

He's got "Personality." Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member Lloyd Price has one of the most powerful voices in New Orleans R&B, on display ever since he roared out of the gate in the '50s with his seminal version of "Lawdy Miss Clawdy." Price had a number of other hits -- "Where Were You (On Our Wedding Day)" -- and his return to Jazz Fest is an opportunity to see a pioneer whose pipes still pack a potent punch.

Ebenezer Baptist Church Mass Choir

2 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

The influence of New Orleans gospel icon Lois Dejean can be felt in this group, as her grandson Jermaine Landrum leads the ensemble. High energy and call-and-response vocals are the hallmarks of this choir.

Bill Miller

2 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

Miller's brand of Native American rock 'n' roll has earned him some noteworthy fans and collaborators, including Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder and contemporary songstress Tori Amos.

Gilberto Santa Rosa

2:05 p.m., Congo Square Stage, World

Gilberto Santa Rosa is known as the "Gentleman of Salsa," thanks to his international touring schedule and platinum albums like Punto de Vista, which spawned the hit singles "Vivir Sin Ella" and "Perdoname." The engaging singer has led his own orchestra for more than a decade now, and his set should inspire some serious dancing.

CRITIC'S PICK

Crown Seekers Gospel Singers

2:45 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This excellent traditional quartet-style gospel group from Marrero has parlayed its superb Jazz Fest performances into national engagements at other festivals such as the Kansas City Jazz & Blues Festival.

CRITIC'S PICK

Tricia "Sista Teedy" Boutte

2:50 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, R&B/Jazz

Part of the musical Boutte family of New Orleans, Tricia Boutte has one of the most arresting voices in town, capable of swooping from a deep-throated growl to a heavenly high note in the blink of an eye. She sings jazz, blues, and R&B, and also sang lead vocals for the reggae band Cool Riddims.

James Rivers Movement

2:50 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL/WWOZ Jazz Tent, R&B/jazz

Saxophonist James Rivers is also a mean bagpipes player, evidence of his talent and broad musical palette. Noted jazz aficionado Clint Eastwood is one of Rivers' biggest fans, and tapped Rivers for contributions to the soundtracks for Eastwood's movies Bird and Bridges of Madison County. Last year, Rivers released the CD Songs People Love to Hear, featuring the R&B, blues and bagpipe standards that his audiences request at every performance.

Big Chief Bo Dollis & the Wild Magnolias

2:55 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Mardi Gras Indian

Despite Big Chief Monk Boudreaux's departure from the Wild Magnolias in 2001, Big Chief Bo Dollis still keeps the Wild Magnolias going full steam ahead. Dollis is one of the most amazing singers in New Orleans, with a soul rasp worthy of comparison to Wilson Pickett. When that voice hits electrified Mardi Gras Indian songs like "Smoke My Peace Pipe," the results are funky, funky, funky.

Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers

3 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Zydeco

A rising star in zydeco, Dwayne Dopsie was crowned "America's Hottest Accordionist" by no less an authority than the American Accordion Association. He started on the instrument when he was 7, emulating his dad, Rockin' Dopsie, and began touring with his own band in 1999. His accordion style bears more than a few traces of the soulful R&B style favored by his father.

Luther Kent & Trickbag

3 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Powerhouse vocalist Kent is tough to beat when he's belting out New Orleans R&B and blues classics. He's been a fixture on the New Orleans blues scene for decades, a singer with great technique who knows his way around standards as well. His Jazz Fest sets are always a treat, as the band Trickbag brings a stacked horn section to fuel Kent's booming voice.

Uptown Okra featuring John Boutte

3:05 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Bluegrass

The upbeat New Orleans band combines traditional Appalachian sounds with New Orleans rhythms, for a unique blend of funky bluegrass. The ensemble recently released their debut CD, which includes a couple of tracks featuring their frequent collaborator John Boutte, who steps out of his gospel, R&B, and jazz shoes and into the country and bluegrass realm.

The Davis Family

3:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This family gospel ensemble hailing from Mobile, Ala., makes a return appearance at Jazz Fest, bringing approximately 15 members and close-knit vocal harmonies.

CRITIC'S PICK

Lil' Band o' Gold with special guests John Fred and Johnnie Allan

3:30 p.m., Acura Stage, Swamp-pop/R&B

The south Louisiana swamp pop supergroup led by drummer Warren Storm, guitarist C.C. Adcock and accordionist Steve Riley welcomes two Louisiana legends for guest appearances today. Expect Johnnie Allan to serve up his smoking version of Chuck Berry's "Promised Land," while John Fred sings his signature song, "Judy in Disguise." It should be a perfect match for Lil' Band o' Gold's full-bodied, horn-driven sound.

Morgan Heritage Family

3:50 p.m., Congo Square Stage, Reggae

This family reggae band has established itself as a force on the contemporary reggae scene, abandoning major label deals to form their own songwriting, production teams, and record label for their acclaimed sound. Their male and female vocal leads and harmonies echo classic Jamaican sounds, on compelling original compositions promoting spiritual awareness.

CRITIC'S PICK

Terence Blanchard

4:10 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

One of New Orleans' best-known trumpeters, Blanchard first gained recognition through his tenure in Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers, and went on to become Spike Lee's soundtrack composer of choice. Blanchard's latest album, Let's Get Lost, celebrates the songs of Jimmy McHugh, with guest vocalists dueting with Blanchard's pure balladry.

CRITIC'S PICK

Terrance Simien

4:10 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Zydeco

This Mallet native's signature melding of high-energy zydeco, reggae and R&B, delivered in vocals reminiscent of Sam Cooke and Aaron Neville, has earned him a following around the world. He's a zydeco modernizer who most recently has opened dates for the Dave Matthews Band, but with his recent album The Tribute Sessions and his Creole for Kids! school programs, he's also doing more than his share to keep his culture vital. At 12:30 p.m. today, Simien will be performing what's sure to be a great set in the Kids' Tent.

CRITIC'S PICK

New Leviathan Oriental Foxtrot Orchestra

4:15 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

Its name was inspired by the S.S. Leviathan Orchestra, an influential 1920s band, and despite the unusual updated moniker, New Leviathan Oriental Foxtrot Orchestra takes its cue from the music of their predecessors. From marching band numbers, rags, and early Creole favorites, New Leviathan performs traditional genres with style -- accented by their ship uniforms.

Sharon Martin & First Take

4:20 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Jazz/R&B

Her band's name is a good indication of Sharon Martin's vibrant, immediate vocals, which she applies to a varied program of New Orleans jazz and R&B.

CRITIC'S PICK

Lil' Ed & the Blues Imperials

4:25 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Slide guitar-fueled Chicago blues, reminiscent of the late great Hound Dog Taylor, doesn't get much better than Lil' Ed & the Blues Imperials. Lil' Ed is a wild, energetic showman who writes clever original songs, then torques them up with his superb backing band. His anthem "Chicken, Biscuits and Gravy" should be a prime show-stopper today.

Lil' Malcolm & the House Rockers

4:30 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Zydeco

Here's yet another in a long line of talented father-son zydeco teams. Accordionist Lil' Malcolm Walker's band, the House Rockers, features his father, Percy Walker, on guitar, and brother Percy Walker Jr. on drums. The multi-generational line-up produces a diverse zydeco sampling of contemporary and traditional sounds -- expect to hear some old-style French tunes, classic R&B-laced material, and the latest "nouveau zydeco" beat.

CRITIC'S PICK

Evangelist Bertha Jackson & the Anointed Jackson Sisters

5:05 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Under the guidance of Evangelist Bertha Jackson, this popular all-female group from North Carolina recently won the award for Quartet Female Group of the Year from the North Carolina Prestige Gospel Awards.

Jimmy Buffett & the Coral Reefer Band

5:30 p.m., Acura Stage, Pop/Rock

After a string of promising mid-70s albums like Son of a Son of Sailor, Jimmy Buffett locked into his beaches-and-boozes formula, and not much has changed since. Expect a nice Louisiana twist at this set, however; Buffett covered Sonny Landreth's "U.S.S. Zydecoldsmobile" on his latest album, and Landreth is expected to sit in for Buffett's performance.

CRITIC'S PICK

Better Than Ezra

5:40 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Rock

One of Louisiana's formidable rock bands, Better Than Ezra built its audience on the local frat circuit and exploded onto the national scene with the breakthrough single "Good." One major label and a few albums later, Ezra's a little older and wiser, but frontman Kevin Griffin still writes amazing hook-filled pop songs, evidenced by "Extra Ordinary," the hit single from their latest album, Closer.

CRITIC'S PICK

Joe Lovano Nonet

5:40 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

Saxophonist Lovano is one of the most creative saxophonists in contemporary jazz, a prolific composer and dominating tenor player who consistently pushes boundaries. He's worked in practically every format imaginable, from quartets to orchestra, and can play everything from bop and swing to standards and blues. All his recent Blue Note CDs are compelling, and Lovano's nonet should provide another canvas full of potential for this horn giant.

Bobby Womack

5:45 p.m., Congo Square Stage, R&B

R&B/soul legend Bobby Womack is often simply called "The Poet," thanks to a string of brilliant Womack-penned songs that include "It's All Over Now" (popularized by the Rolling Stones) and "Lookin' For a Love" (of J. Geils Band fame). Womack's also an underrated guitar player who influenced Sly Stone's early-70s sound, and this set is a too-rare Louisiana appearance by Womack.

Liz McComb: The Spirit of New Orleans

5:45 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Gospel

Gospel singer McComb calls Paris home, but she feels a deep attachment to New Orleans and the work of gospel pioneer Mahalia Jackson. She recently recorded an album titled Spirit of New Orleans, a tribute to Jackson that she'll draw from for this stirring performance.

CRITIC'S PICK

Snooks Eaglin

5:50 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues/R&B

Eaglin is a New Orleans legend, a virtuoso guitarist who has an encyclopedic memory of rhythm and blues, country and pop songs, which he filters through his expressive vocals and idiosyncratic, percussive guitar playing. He still sets the benchmark for many local players, and the big news this Jazz Fest is the limited release of Eaglin's new album, The Way It Is, a long-awaited CD that was held up when Eaglin's former record label closed shop.

Ritmo Caribeno

5:50 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, World

A Jazz Fest veteran for 15 years, Ritmo Caribeno is an internationally recognized Latin catch-all band. The name means "Caribbean Rhythm," but the band features players and styles from all over: salsa, merengue, cumbia, balada, and more. A 12-piece outfit with a full horn section, Ritmo has wowed audiences at festivals all over the country as well as overseas.

Willis Prudhomme & Zydeco Express

6 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Zydeco

Willis Prudhomme hails from Kinder, and like many zydeco musicians from the western part of the state, he has an ear for Cajun music as well. With influences including Cajun pioneer Nathan Abshire, Prudhomme is likely to perform a number of zydeco waltzes and old-style two-steps in this set. He'll also likely perform his "Cornbread Two-Step," the foundation for the hit "Give Him Cornbread" by the late Beau Jocque (a friend of Prudhomme's who lived near him in Kinder).

Watson Memorial Teaching Ministries

6:05 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Named for founder Thomas Benjamin Watson, this large choir has been singing for more than three decades. Seventy members strong, its voices should make a glorious noise to close out the Gospel Tent today.

SUNDAY, MAY 5

Today's Parades:

Noon Jetsetters Ladies, Scene Boosters, Popular Ladies and Distinguished Gentlemen SAPCs with Tornado Brass Band

1 p.m. Creole Wild West and Carrollton Hunters Mardi Gras Indians

2 p.m. Westbank Steppers, Original Prince of Wales Men and Prince of Wales Ladies SAPCs with Highsteppers Brass Band

3 p.m. Golden Arrows and Mohawk Hunters Mardi Gras Indians

4 p.m. Original Lady Buckjumpers, Buckjumper Men, Nine Times and Perfect Gentlemen SAPCs with Coolbone Brass Band

Cosmopolitan Evangelist BC Choir

11 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This choir kicks off the Gospel Tent today with its rich harmonies and call-and-response vocals.

Dineh Tah Native Dancers

11:10 a.m., Acura Stage; 12:45 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

Representing the Navajo (or Dineh) Nation, Dineh Tah is a young mix of male and female dancers performing their tribe's native rituals.

Richwell Ison

11:15 a.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

The tradition of New Orleans trumpeters includes Richwell Ison, who brings his own take on contemporary jazz in his blowing.

SUNO Jazz Ensemble

11:15 a.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Contemporary Jazz

The jazz students at Southern University New Orleans show what they've learned under the tutelage of legendary educator and free jazz innovator Edward "Kidd" Jordan.

B.B. Major Blues Band

11:20 a.m., Blues Tent, Blues

His initials mirror one of his "major" influences, B.B. King, though Natchitoches, La., native B.B. Major has also been inspired by Little Milton. Both touchstones are evident on Major's latest CD, I Ain't Got Nobody.

Soprano Meets Clarinet of Sweden

11:20 a.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

This Scandinavian group is just one small example of the reach of jazz, featuring Ulf Dreber on soprano saxophone, Tommy Löbel on clarinet, Jakob Ullberger on guitar, Hasse Ekstrand on piano and Peo Lundin on bass.

Po' Henry & Tookie

11:25 a.m., Lagniappe Stage, Blues

Straight outta Richland Parish come Po' Henry & Tookie, a guitar/harmonica duo steeped in the Mississippi Delta blues tradition.

Los Babies

11:30 a.m., Congo Square Stage, Latin

Led by Honduras native Juan Montes, Los Babies has played Latin party music since its formation in 1988. The 11-piece band (boasting members from Guatemala, Nicaragua and the Philippines) plays Latin standards and originals in a staggering range of styles including merengue, salsa, punta, cumbia, bachata and Latin ballads. Los Babies are a popular attraction in local nightclubs and at national festivals.

Butch Mudbone

11:30 a.m. & 3:15 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Blues

Blues guitarist Butch Mudbone has the perfect name for the genre, and he's traveled far and wide, playing for dollars from strangers with his amp and guitar. This blues nomad has also recorded his own fair share of original material on his CDs.

Antioch Gospel Singers

11:45 a.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

This New Orleans-based group, led by Archie Chiles, fills the gospel tent with its songs of praise and devotion.

Jesse Lege

11:45 a.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Cajun

Four years ago, the Cajun Music Hall of Fame made it official: Jesse Lege is a living legend. The pride of Lake Charles is one of south Louisiana's truly great singers and accordion players, having won several of the top awards from the Cajun French Music Association.

Monk Boudreaux & the Golden Eagles Mardi Gras Indians

12:10 p.m., Acura Stage, Mardi Gras

Boudreaux assembled a new version of his Golden Eagles band this year, featuring funky Meters guitarist Brian Stoltz as bandleader. The result is an intoxicating blend of electric funk as the underpinning for Boudreaux's traditional chanting on songs like "Shallow Water."

Al Belletto Big Jazz Band

12:20 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

He gigged with Louis Prima and Woody Herman, mapped out the music for Hef's Playboy clubs, and has played every Jazz Fest since its inception. So it's safe to say that bandleader and saxophonist Al Belletto has been around. Belletto's most recent CD was 1998's Jazznocracy.

Fredy Omar con su Banda

12:20 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Latin

Honduras native and adopted New Orleanian Fredy Omar is a mainstay on the local Latin music scene. His performances at Café Brasil and the Red Room are packed with locals who dance till the wee hours to Fredy's bell-like voice and spicy salsa band. Sing along to his Frenchmen Street version of "Mardi Gras Mambo" and his contagious hit "Mambo 504."

Placide Adams & the Original Dixieland Hall Jazz Band

12:25 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent

Today, multi-instrumentalist Placide Adams joins this band, which has quite a legacy to uphold. ODJB is often credited with recording the first jazz recording ever, in 1917. The current incarnation of the band is led by Jimmy LaRocca, grandson of band founder Nick LaRocca, and hews close to its original sound.

Pat "Mother Blues" Cohen

12:25 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Mama mia! Mother Blues keeps it down-home and dirty, as she shows in her playing around town.

Octavia Denise & the 5 Stars of Praise

12:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Expect vibrant vocals and driving rhythmic choruses from this dynamic ensemble.

Herman Jackson

12:30 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Contemporary Jazz

When he's not gigging with Alvin Batiste's Jazztronauts, drummer Herman Jackson also leads his own modern-jazz combo.

Allen Fontenot & the Country Cajuns

1 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage

Fiddler Allen Fontenot is a Jazz Fest mainstay who pioneered Cajun music in New Orleans -- and throughout much of the rest of the world, as well. One of the first Cajun musicians to tour extensively, Fontenot has brought his Cajun-country hybrid everywhere from Bourbon Street to the Charles Bronson movie Hard Times, and he's gone out on the road with zydeco players such as the late Rockin' Sidney and locally based Grammy winner Al Rapone.

Casper Lomayesva "Reggae inna Hopiland"

1 p.m., Congo Square Stage, Reggae

Hopi singer Casper Lomayesva (aka Casper Loma-Da-Wa) creates music that combines the positive vibes of reggae with those of his Native American culture. Spawned when Freddie McGregor became the first reggae artist to perform on an Indian reservation, this rare fusion illuminates the similarities between the two ideological traditions. Infused with a message of hope, power and peace, Lomayesva's lyrics relay the realities of reservation life.

Paulette Wright Davis

1:15 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

New Orleans' own Paulette Wright Davis has been singing gospel since she was a kid, and has developed a contemporary brand of gospel that's equally accessible and spiritual all at once. Her style can be heard on her most recent CD, Psalmstress.

Hawk Henries

1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

Flute player Henries plays his own handmade flutes, and is a regular performer at Native American pow wows throughout the Northeast.

Kidd Jordan, Al Fielder & IAQ

1:30 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

Native New Orleanian reedsman Edward "Kidd" Jordan is an international free jazz heavyweight who has collaborated with the likes of Cecil Taylor and Cannonball Adderley. Knighted by the French government for his contribution to the European performing arts, Jordan is as progressive as they come, pushing the limits with impeccable musicianship and otherworldly improvisation.

Papa Grows Funk

1:30 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Funk

Former member of George Porter Jr.'s Runnin' Pardners and horn-rock band Mulebone, keyboardist John Gros started Papa Grows Funk out of developments from his regular Monday night jam sessions. Guitarist June Yamagishi is the outstanding player in this nationally popular New Orleans funk band. Expect Meters gems as well as funky originals from the band's debut CD, Doin' It.

Ratdog featuring Bob Weir

1:30 p.m., Acura Stage, Rock

Grateful Dead vocalist and rhythm guitarist Weir revisits favorites from the Grateful Dead canon in this offshoot band he started before Jerry Garcia's death. DJ Logic is a frequent guest with the band, adding new textures to classics like "Sugar Magnolia," and the band has a handful of solid new songs, heard on its 2001 CD, Evening Moods.

Gregg Stafford's Jazz Hounds

1:35 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

Founded by the late Danny Barker, the Jazz Hounds are now led by another jazz preservationist, trumpeter Gregg Stafford. Stafford's also a co-founder of the Black Men of Labor Social Aid and Pleasure Club.

Wanda Rouzan & A Taste of New Orleans

1:35 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

Rouzan has enough sass for three soul divas, giving Festers a Taste of New Orleans by hop-scotching through a set of blues, R&B, jazz and New Orleans classics.

Chevere

1:40 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Contemporary Jazz

Inspired by keyboardist Dave Ellington, the eight-piece Chevere serves up a slinky collection of Latin-inspired music that can be heard on its 2000 release, Bailar Mi Ritmo. Look for a little merengue and salsa urged on by the group's dancers.

Medicine Tail

2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

This ensemble offers a primer on traditional Native American rituals, dancing and singing.

New Orleans Spiritualettes

2 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Since its inception in 1956, the Spiritualettes have performed traditional gospel with occasional excursions into secular music.

CRITIC'S PICK

Papa Wemba & Viva La Musica of The Congo

2:20 p.m., Congo Square Stage, World

A descendent of a long line of BaTatela warrior chieftains, Papa Wemba (aka "the King of Rhumba") has had a profound influence on the development of African music since the '70s. Learning much of his musical sensitivity from his mother, a professional funeral singer, Wemba developed a sound that most critics agree is the "perfect" balance of traditional African music and Western pop -- a fusion now known the world over as "Afro-pop."

CRITIC'S PICK

Rosie Ledet & the Zydeco Playboys

2:25 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do-Do Stage, Zydeco

This year's Big Easy Entertainment Award winner for Best Zydeco Artist, Rosie Ledet's sound was summed up in the New York Press as "awesomely sexy and kickass zydeco." On a series of Maison de Soul albums, including last year's Show Me Something, Rosie and husband/bassist Morris Ledet have developed a zydeco sound built on a Boozoo Chavis foundation, with sultry R&B-style vocals and double-entendre songs such as "I'm Gonna Take Care of Your Dog" and "Eat My Dust." (The latter is a double entendre only in French; look it up for yourself.)

The Dudes

2:45 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Roots Rock

Still miss the subdudes? Pine no more, as this spinoff of the veteran New Orleans roots-rock band is dusting off 'dudes classics like "Light in Your Eyes." The band features original subdudes members Tommy Malone, John Magnie, and Steve Amedee, augmented by members of Malone and Magnie and Amedee's respective bands. Expect old favorites and new material.

Johnson Extension

2:45 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Community activist and leader Lois Dejean's influences extend to this gospel-singing family that has been singing with praise for years.

David Sanchez

2:45 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL/WWOZ Jazz Tent

David Sanchez took the percussive jazz of his native Puerto Rico and took them to New York, where the saxophonist became an instant sensation. He has toured with an impressive string of groups, including Dizzy Gillespie's United Nation Orchestra, Slide Hampton's Jazz Masters, and Danilo Perez. His most recent CD is last year's Travesia.

CRITIC'S PICK

Corey Harris

2:55 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues

For such a young bluesman obviously in touch with so many diverse giants in the genre -- from Robert Johnson and Charley Patton to Son House and Blind Boy Fuller -- the 33-year-old Corey Harris make his original blues sound remarkably unified. Harris collaborated with pianist Henry Butler on 2000's excellent Vu-Du Menz, but will release his first CD of his own in three years, Downhome Sophisticate, just in time for Jazz Fest.

CRITIC'S PICK

Don Vappie & the Creole Jazz Serenaders

3 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

Whether playing it onstage, studying it at home or delighting WWOZ listeners with his own collection (and cornball humor), Don Vappie is a banjo-playing trad-jazz delight. And now he's a movie star: Vappie appeared in Glen Pitre's World War II-era film, The Scoundrel's Wife. (It wasn't a stretch; that's him strumming the banjo in the dancehall scene.) Vappie's effervescence is infectious.

Woodenhead

3 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Rock

Guitarist Jimmy Robinson has been leading this eclectic roots-rock group since its formation in 1975, playing challenging, sophisticated rock. The band is releasing a long-awaited CD just in time for Jazz Fest.

Phil Lesh & Friends

3:15 p.m., Acura Stage, Rock

The Grateful Dead bassist is back on the road again, with a hand-picked band that includes Allman Brothers/Gov't Mule guitarist Warren Haynes. The band revisits some of the lesser-known songs in the Dead canon, such as the early psychedelic work "Caution: Do Not Step on the Tracks." Later this month, Lesh & Friends release their debut album.

CRITIC'S PICK

Sherman Washington & the Zion Harmonizers

3:30 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

The ambassadors of New Orleans gospel, Sherman Washington & the Zion Harmonizers have 63 years together, spreading the traditional sound. Washington is a Jazz Fest legend twice over: Before he performs with his group, as he has done for 33 years, Washington fills in the rest of the gospel acts in his role as the Gospel Tent coordinator.

The Baha Men

4 p.m., Congo Square Stage, World

Strongly rooted in the contagious West African-Bahamian junkanoo tradition, the Baha Men dance on the connection between Caribbean rhythm and modern American urban pop. Only a cave dweller wouldn't recognize their 2000 smash hit, "Who Let the Dogs Out?"

Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys

4 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do-Do Stage, Cajun

Always a Fest highlight. With influences ranging from the Balfa Brothers to Moby, a band once hailed as new traditionalists is now one of the freshest and most continually surprising groups to emerge from the state. Their sweep ranges from twin-fiddle Cajun reels to Clifton Chenier-style zydeco to swamp pop. In addition to Riley, the Playboy talents include Sam Broussard, fiddler/sax player David Greely, bassist/singer Blaine Gaspard, and longtime Playboy drummer Kevin Dugas.

CRITIC'S PICK

Aaron Neville

4:15 p.m., Gospel Tent, Gospel

With the frame of a bodyguard and the voice of an angel, Aaron Neville capitalizes on his quivering falsetto to sing songs of faith and devotion inside his home away from home: the Gospel Tent. Almost as much a tradition as his brothers' closing set on the main stage, Neville's gospel tunes will be pulled partly from his latest CD, Devotion.

Buckwheat Zydeco

4:15 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Zydeco

Already a popular Lafayette soul/funk bandleader when he brought his Hammond organ into Clifton Chenier's Red Hot Louisiana Band, Buckwheat Zydeco went on to create his own contemporary zydeco sound and take his accordion to uncharted stages like the Olympics and the Boston Pops. He's been a frequent guest on Letterman and numerous other national shows, but he hasn't forgotten his roots: last year's excellent album, Down Home Live, was recorded live at El Sid O's in Lafayette on a memorable Thanksgiving night.

CRITIC'S PICK

Abbey Lincoln

4:20 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL/WWOZ Jazz Tent

Inspired by Billie Holiday and influenced by Max Roach, Abbey Lincoln's storied career has continued its impressive resurgence even as she stares down 72. From supper-club singer to jazz legend, Lincoln recorded several albums with Roach (with whom she was married from 1962-70) and later paid tribute to Holiday on two different albums. Her most recent effort is 2000's Over the Years.

Pete Fountain

4:25 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

People almost reflexively associate the word Dixieland with Pete Fountain; the two have been inextricably intertwined for 55 years -- the past two decades of which Fountain has spent headlining at his own club at the Hilton Hotel. A featured performer in the Dixieland combo that performed with the Lawrence Welk Orchestra, Fountain has produced more than 90 albums, and along the way has realized the melodic possibilities of the sound.

Percussion, Inc.

4:25 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, World

An organization for rhythm education, Percussion, Inc. gives lectures at local schools with ethnic drum demonstrations. At the Fair Grounds, the drum troupe, backed by a conventional band, will visit the rhythmic roots of the world via traditional drums such as jembeh (West Africa) and bata (Cuba).

Walter "Wolfman" Washington & the Roadmasters

4:20 p.m., Blues Tent, R&B/Funk

The Wolfman is a modern medical marvel, as vibrant a performer as he was 30 years ago. One of New Orleans' most popular party bands, Washington and his Roadmasters dance between funk, rhythm and blues, and straight-up blues, on inspired cover songs and terrific originals from recent CDs like Funk Is in the House.

Cosmopolitan Church of Prayer Choir

5:05 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Led by Dr. Charles G. Hayes, this large choir is a Southern gospel mainstay and records for Mississippi-based Malaco Records.

The Neville Brothers

5:30 p.m., Acura Stage, R&B/Funk

The Nevilles gear up for Jazz Fest the way Mardi Gras Indians gear up for Mardi Gras -- and there's a little cross-referencing here with the first family of New Orleans music. Here's wishing that keyboardist (and Meters founder) Art Neville has recovered from surgery to join brothers Aaron (vocals), Charles (saxophone) and Cyril (vocals and percussion) along with drummer "Mean" Willie Green and others. Either way, it's hard to resist the pull from the Nevilles to close out the day with their inspired set.

Teena Marie

5:35 p.m., Congo Square Stage, R&B

It took the genius of no less than Berry Gordy and Rick James to discover what fans would later find out: Teena Marie was the funkiest white girl on the planet. The most successful white musician ever at Motown fused funk and soul into a heady mix, but it wasn't until she joined Epic Records (after a dispute with Motown over royalties) that Marie enjoyed her greatest hit: "Lovergirl." While her later excursions into rock and jazz fusion lost some followers, Marie still plays packed two-night stands at House of Blues on a regular basis.

Chris Ardoin & Double Clutchin'

5:45 p.m., Sheraton N.O. Fais Do Do Stage, Zydeco

One of a long line of Ardoin accordion talents (including his grandfather Bois Sec and father, Lawrence "Black"), Chris Ardoin was playing in Carnegie Hall before he was a teenager. With his brother Sean -- who branched off to form his own band, ZydeKool -- he started Double Clutchin'. It's a young band that builds its sound on a contemporary "double-kicking" zydeco dance beat, often adapting old family classics for a new crowd.

John Mooney & Bluesiana

5:45 p.m., Blues Tent, Blues/Funk

John Mooney's blend of second-line blues was inspired by two mentors: Son House and Professor Longhair. Mooney's a ferocious slide guitarist, capable of some serious showmanship when he does his over/under-the-guitar-neck playing. He's recorded extensively, and his new CD, All I Want, just hit the streets in time for Jazz Fest.

Nation of Change

5:45 p.m., Native American Village Stage, Native American

The Nation of Change presents a wide spectrum of Native American dances, including both men's and women's traditional movements: fancy dance, women's fancy shawl, grass dance and hoop dance. The dances are set to flute playing and powwow drumming.

The Radiators

5:45 p.m., Sprint PCS/LG Mobile Phone Stage, Rock

Jazz Fest always seems to bring the best of these New Orleans rock veterans, now jamming toward their 25th anniversary. The Rads' sprawling mix of roots rock, extended jams and lowdown New Orleans funk keeps on keepin' on with the guitar duels of Dave Malone and Camile Baudoin and the piano-professor boogie of Ed Volker.

Javier Gutierrez & Acoustic Swiftness

5:50 p.m., Lagniappe Stage, Latin

Led by Bolivian-born guitarist Javier Gutierrez, Acoustic Swiftness is a full-scale Latin band drawing influences from Brazilian bossa nova, jazz, classical guitar, and Andean folk. A favorite of the Frenchmen Street Latin dance scene, Acoustic Swiftness was one of the first bands to play at Cafe Brasil.

CRITIC'S PICK

Nicholas Payton's Soul Patrol

5:55 p.m., BellSouth FastAccess DSL/WWOZ Jazz Tent, Contemporary Jazz

The Big Easy Entertainment Awards' Entertainer of the Year already has plenty of soul in his jazz trumpet playing, and takes it one step further with this ensemble, which spotlights the R&B and soul influences in Payton's playing. If you've heard his dazzling cover of the Stylistics' "People Make the World Go Round," there's more where that came from. Of course, Payton always has one foot planted firmly in the Crescent City with his melodic playing.

Preservation Hall Jazz Band

6 p.m., XM Satellite Radio Economy Hall Tent, Traditional Jazz

Considering its local, regional, national and international reputation, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band could rest on its laurels. But the band takes its legacy seriously, at home and abroad. One need look no further than Leroy Jones, Dr. Michael White, Gregg Stafford and Wendell Brunious to see the quality of musicians that the PHJB represents.

Tyrone Foster & the Arc Singers

6:05 p.m., Rhodes Gospel Tent, Gospel

Tyrone Foster puts everything he's got into this final day at the Gospel Tent, leader the Arc Singers with a spirituality that is quite moving.

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