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Preview: Disclosure

Noah Bonaparte Pais on the English electronic music duo coming to Republic

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"How do you stay motivated in the midst of everything that's going on?" How indeed. Not even Daft Punk — against whom Disclosure competed this week for the Best Dance/Electronica Album Grammy (results unknown at press time, but come on) — provided an EDM moment in 2013 as hugely inviting as "When a Fire Starts to Burn," the big-tent revival that opens Guy and Howard Lawrence's debut LP Settle (Island). House music hasn't had this much curbside appeal since the masked ones' 2001 blowup Discovery, making Disclosure's inclusion at the Grammys into more than just a Buffalo Bills Super Bowl bid. It's possible the Surrey, England, siblings got lucky and won; more important is the matchup, considering that Guy and Howard, ages 21 and 18 respectively, were 8 and 5 when "One More Time" first hit, opening house to a flood of pop innovators. That model — seamless originals and samples, an ecstatic mix of lifting hooks and dropping beats — is rendered perfectly on Settle, with the notable renovations of U.K. garage (bobbed-out two-step rhythms and hi-hats pushed to the tipping point). It doesn't hurt that it plays like a greatest hits collection, stacking single upon single: "Latch," "F For You" and "White Noise" could be the spine of any all-time great dance record; here, along with the lighter-fluid "When a Fire Starts to Burn," they're the first four tracks. Later, British sirens Eliza Doolittle ("You & Me"), Jessie Ware ("Confess to Me") and Hannah Reid ("Help Me Lose My Mind") all contribute vocals that marry their own individuality with the central vision. That may be the most impressive thing about Disclosure: Past all the attention, influences, guest artists and associations, there is a master plan being directed by two should-be amateurs. Vic Mensa and Samo Sound Boy open. Tickets $25 in advance, $30 day of show. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

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