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Lofty Notions

Developer Sean Cummings transforms a former box factory into a 29-unit residential loft complex with ideals.

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When asked about his latest project, Lengsfield Lofts, a box factory-turned-residential loft building in the Warehouse District, developer Sean Cummings first answers with the broad strokes ­ enumerating the necessary elements for what he calls "a quintessentially great loft building." Having completed 12 such developments in the city, he and his company, ekistics, have carefully honed the concept.

"This is a lifestyle purchase," says Cummings, who's currently renovating a home of his own on Esplanade Avenue. "It has a personality, the same way Apple Computers, iPods, and Aveda hair-care products do. And there are a couple of components that distinguish a fair or good product from an off-the-charts great one."

In business since 1988 and one of the first to bring stylish boutique hotels to New Orleans in the 1990s, Cummings specializes in style-conscious spaces that manage to be cutting-edge while also paying subtle homage to their origins and locations. Heading the list of components that he considers key to an exceptional loft are large, open spaces featuring architectural artifacts that are evidence of the building's past, such as patinaed brick walls, support columns, and industrial windows. The four-story Lengsfield building, which now includes 29 residences (five of them penthouses), had all of those things when Cummings purchased it in 2002, and today, for the most part, they are highlighted rather than concealed as an integral part of the package.

"It's a way of staying true to that legacy rooted in the changing uses of old industrial buildings," says Cummings.

Other essential ingredients, he says, are roomy, spa-like bathrooms, modern electronics, and contemporary yet timelessly designed, even iconic fixtures. All of the building's condominiums feature high-speed wireless Internet access, granite countertops, award-winning plumbing fixtures, sleek pendant track lighting, and designer fans. The communal areas are elevated beyond the mundane by means of one-of-a-kind touches created by local artists and by adaptive reuse of materials found in the building. The lobby's illuminated, glass-enclosed mail center was created by artist David Gregor, while its sculpture-like display of wall-anchored panels was made with sheets of metal taken out of the building during the renovation. Flanking the elevator banks on each of the four floors are glass sconces by Mitchell Gaudet of Studio Inferno. Though they vary from floor to floor, all use motifs that reference the building's original function of manufacturing boxes used for shipping.

At just under 1,700 square feet, the model loft (pictured here) is slightly smaller than the building average. But each of the elements behind the design philosophy that holds sway at ekistics is present in its design. Architect Wayne Troyer designed the lofts with a minimalist aesthetic in order to achieve not only an open flow but also to emphasize the distinction between the existing characteristics of the building and its new, contemporary viewpoint. The raw quality of its bare, brick walls, sprinkler pipes, concrete floors, and vast windows are juxtaposed with refined surface materials, artistic plumbing fixtures, and sleek, contemporary furnishings. Traditional residential treatments, such as moldings were foregone in favor of unadorned, pale gray walls that create a gallery feel. In fact, Cummings and his team encourage owners to use the entrance corridor as a place to display art.

As in most lofts, the public areas -- kitchen, dining room and living room -- occupy a single, large space and are delineated by means of built-in cabinetry and furniture placement. A sliding partition, designed by Troyer and custom made of an opaque polycarbonate trimmed with galvanized metal, provides privacy for the master bedroom and bath without interrupting the flow of the exposed masonry wall that extends into both the living room and bedroom. Only the second bedroom and bath, located off the entrance hall, are separated by walls.

The same pared-down approach is found in the master bath, which combines neutral-toned travertine with a warm, honey-colored vanity made from pine beams recycled from the original interior of the building, a white top-mounted sink, and a freestanding "spoon tub" by Agape to produce a soothing, Zen-like simplicity.

Like the architecture itself, the furnishings, purchased through the Miami-based showroom Luminaire, were kept ultra-spare, contemporary, and where possible, related to their environs. The "S chair" in the master bedroom is made of Louisiana marsh straw and the dining table from oak.

"There's a strong emphasis on time and place," says Cummings, who sells to a market of buyers that clearly appreciates both. "We're seeing folks from New York and L.A., who are asking 'Where would we like to have a second home?' And choosing here."

Calming Repast -- Bare brick walls, a cement - floor and lots of natural light make for pleasant repasts - in a dining area with a table made of oak and simple - chairs covered in white. The table is conveniently located - near the kitchen and work island and is adjacent to the - common living space. The place settings on the table are - from Belladonna Day Spa. - DAVID RICHMOND
  • David Richmond
  • Calming Repast -- Bare brick walls, a cement floor and lots of natural light make for pleasant repasts in a dining area with a table made of oak and simple chairs covered in white. The table is conveniently located near the kitchen and work island and is adjacent to the common living space. The place settings on the table are from Belladonna Day Spa.
Seamless design -- The master bath's spa-like - ambience is the result of spare design and soothing - tones: the floors and shower area are travertine, the - elliptical sink and "spoon tub" are by Agape, the faucet - fixtures are by Vola and the vanity area is made from old - pine beams reclaimed from the building. Soap and glass - pitcher used as a vase are from Belladonna. - DAVID RICHMOND
  • David Richmond
  • Seamless design -- The master bath's spa-like ambience is the result of spare design and soothing tones: the floors and shower area are travertine, the elliptical sink and "spoon tub" are by Agape, the faucet fixtures are by Vola and the vanity area is made from old pine beams reclaimed from the building. Soap and glass pitcher used as a vase are from Belladonna.
Cooking light -- The kitchen's wall of cabinets - was conceived to look like furniture and stained black in - order to recede rather than stand out among the minimal - furnishings. The space is outfitted with Jenn-Air - appliances and suspended track lighting from Luminaire. - The espresso machine and juicer on the kitchen counter - are from Williams-Sonoma, the lucky bamboo is from - Mitch's flower shop, and the bowl on the island is from - Udwell. - CHERYL GERBER
  • Cheryl Gerber
  • Cooking light -- The kitchen's wall of cabinets was conceived to look like furniture and stained black in order to recede rather than stand out among the minimal furnishings. The space is outfitted with Jenn-Air appliances and suspended track lighting from Luminaire. The espresso machine and juicer on the kitchen counter are from Williams-Sonoma, the lucky bamboo is from Mitch's flower shop, and the bowl on the island is from Udwell.
Essentials only -- The master bedroom is a - study in simplicity, containing a bed by Mondo, two - bedside tables, and a sinuous woven chair with a metal - frame. The three glass vases are from Udwell, and the - polka dot pillows on the bed and the slippers on the - floor are from Bellanoche. - CHERYL GERBER
  • Cheryl Gerber
  • Essentials only -- The master bedroom is a study in simplicity, containing a bed by Mondo, two bedside tables, and a sinuous woven chair with a metal frame. The three glass vases are from Udwell, and the polka dot pillows on the bed and the slippers on the floor are from Bellanoche.
Long shot -- The kitchen, dining and central - living areas of the loft are carved out of a large, - rectangular space and delineated by built-in cabinetry - and contemporary furnishings. The furnishings were - chosen from Luminaire, and the shades are by Mecco. A - triptych of paintings by artist David Harouni hangs - against the wall near the entrance of the loft. The sliding - polycarbonate door was fabricated by local craftsman - David Borgerding. - DAVID RICHMOND
  • David Richmond
  • Long shot -- The kitchen, dining and central living areas of the loft are carved out of a large, rectangular space and delineated by built-in cabinetry and contemporary furnishings. The furnishings were chosen from Luminaire, and the shades are by Mecco. A triptych of paintings by artist David Harouni hangs against the wall near the entrance of the loft. The sliding polycarbonate door was fabricated by local craftsman David Borgerding.
Out of the box -- Developer Sean Cummings - of ekistics has built 12 residential loft buildings in the - city, including his latest, Lengsfield Lofts, a former box - factory located in the Warehouse District. Here he is in - the lobby of Lengsfield beside the mail station. - CHERYL GERBER
  • Cheryl Gerber
  • Out of the box -- Developer Sean Cummings of ekistics has built 12 residential loft buildings in the city, including his latest, Lengsfield Lofts, a former box factory located in the Warehouse District. Here he is in the lobby of Lengsfield beside the mail station.

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