News

Jazz Fest Week 2

Previews and Critics Picks

comment
Friday, May 4

Parades

1 p.m. Original Big Seven Social Aid & Pleasure Club with Stooges Brass Band

3 p.m. Lady Sequence Social Aid & Pleasure Club with TBC Brass Band

The Gentilly Groovemasters
11:15 a.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

Original Groovemaster Bennie Sims founded this Reading, Penn., outfit with Cliff Starkey, familiar to millions as the keyboardist for the Emeril Live band. The adult-contemporary duo's self-released 2003 debut, The Groovemasters Play On, combines modern R&B vocals with smooth jazz instrumentation.

Coco Robicheaux & Spiritland
11:15 a.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

Through the Orleans imprint and his eponymous label, Spiritland, gravel-throated blues shaman Coco Robicheaux has been releasing records since 1995. On his finest, Louisiana Medicine Man, he evokes the sights, sounds and smells of the Crescent City in his own unique way.

June Gardner
11:15 a.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health
June Gardner was musically raised on traditional jazz with a healthy dose of R&B and soul. He is a respected drummer from the heyday of New Orleans soul. He is a veteran of bands that backed Lou Rawls and Sam Cooke.

Gospel Inspirations of Boutte
11:15 a.m., AIG Gospel Tent

Lost Bayou Ramblers
11:20 a.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
With a setup that predates Edison (lap steel, accordion, fiddle, upright bass), the Lost Bayou Ramblers carry the torch for old-time Cajun music into the modern era. The Lafayette quintet's infectious music, captured on the recently recorded Live At The Blue Moon, consists of time-tested classics alongside originals from the Michot brothers.

Kumbuka African Drum & Dance Collective
11:20 a.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

Led by artistic director Ausettua Amor Amenkum, Kumbuka has been New Orleans premier African dance ensemble since forming in the early '80s. The 15-member group explores dances from sub-Saharan Africa as well as African-American dance.

Batiste Brothers Band
11:30 a.m., Acura Stage

Peter, David and Paul are the namesake Batiste Brothers, R&B statesmen and consummate showmen who have performed together since 1976. A busy year for the Brothers, 2005 saw the release of three new Artang recordings: The Bus Stops Here, Tribute To My Parents and It's A Lick And A Promise.

The Benjy Davis Project
11:30 a.m., Gentilly Stage

This Baton Rouge-based band plays rock that appeals to the collegiate indie crowd. There's plenty of sunny Southern flavor with audible influences ranging from the North Mississippi Allstars to Hootie and the Blowfish.

Rumba Buena
11:30 a.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage

This 12-piece Latin horn band celebrates flavors of Cuba, Puerto Rico and Mexico, via the classic big Rumba sound.

Pastor Sean T. Elder & the Mt. Hernon Baptist Church Mass Choir
Noon, AIG Gospel Tent

A full generation of gospel experience is the hallmark of this choir based in Avondale. ItÕs pure gospel, sure to rattle your heavenly gates.

Sharon Martin
12:20 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

A powerful jazz vocalist, Sharon Martin has shared the microphone with luminaries like Ellis Marsalis and Deacon John. In addition to her onstage work, Martin serves on the board of the New Orleans Blues Project, a grassroots campaign for cultural economic development.

Po' Henry & Tookie
12:20 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

This Northeast Louisiana guitarist plays traditional old-style Delta blues in the tradition of Muddy Waters, Lightning Hopkins and John B. Hooker. At the age of eight, Po' Henry constructed his own one-string guitar with broom wire. These days he's moved on to a proper six-string, while Tookie (aka Wayne Collom) also plays guitar, harmonica and sings.

Lionel Ferbos & the Palm Court Jazz Band
12:20 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

Trumpeter and bandleader Lionel Ferbos, who continues to perform into his late nineties — is the ultimate example of the ageless New Orleans musician. His take on traditional jazz is as pure as it gets in the Big Easy, treating the classics such as "St. Louis Blues" with infinite respect.

Kevin Gordon
12:30 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

Hailing from the I-20 corridor near Shreveport, Kevin Gordon brings a rugged and soulful blues-country sound to the stage. His latest release is O Come Look At The Burning.

New Orleans Mardi Gras Indian Rhythm Indian Section
12:30 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

The Indian rhythm section occasionally stomps into Indian practices in Central City and takes over. Often Big Chief Roddy of the Black Eagles sings with them and he's got a voice that can carry over the entire Fair Grounds.

Lusher Charter Jazz Ensemble
12:30 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage

Lil' Band o' Gold
12:35 p.m., Acura Stage

This long-running Lafayette-based combo features legendary drummer Warren Storm and Cajun strutter C.C. Adcock on lead guitar. Multiple generations of musicians join up to play tear-jerking swamp pop and Louisiana-style rock 'n' roll.

Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes
12:45 p.m., Gentilly Stage

Conservatory-trained players cut loose with a rock 'n' roll-funk blend. The group's smart music can heat up a barroom, but well-executed improvisations belie the members' jazz backgrounds.

Herman Jackson
12:45 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage

Herman Jackson's grand piano has graced a host of recent popular albums by everyone from OutKast to Gladys Knight, Too $hort to the Temptations. In addition to his prodigious session work, Jackson is also an accomplished arranger and composer. His self-released debut, Magic Touch, appeared in 2004.

The Dynamic Smooth Family Gospel Singers
12:45 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

The instrumental work is as powerful as the singing with this group. The members' sweet harmonies bring out the best in an offering of praise songs.

Ellis Marsalis
1:25 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

The former head of UNO's Jazz Studies program has not taken too well to retirement over the past six years, fashioning his own label (ELM) with his wife, touring occasionally and holding down his traditional Friday-night gig at Snug Harbor. Hurricane Katrina forced the patriarch of the luminous Marsalis family (Wynton, Branford, Jason and Delfeayo) to focus a bit on rebuilding his damaged home. While Ellis is working on a new album pulling from Thelonius Monk's impressive canon, fans can still enjoy his 2005 release, Ruminations In New York (ELM/ESP-Disk).

Louis "Gearshifter" Youngblood
1:25 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

During the week, Louis Arzo Youngblood of Mississippi earns his nickname driving a gravel truck. He plays blues only on weekends. His career began in the 1930s, when Youngblood's great aunt Essie Mae's sister Rosa married Robert Johnson. Today Youngblood is celebrated as a solo acoustic artist who blends the country blues of his youth with soul/blues classics.

Mark Braud
1:25 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

Descended from trumpet-wielding troubadours, Mark Braud has traditional jazz coursing through his veins. Since graduating from the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts — which helped launch the careers of Harry Connick Jr. and Branford Marsalis — Braud brought acclaim to his two outfits, the New Orleans Jazz Giants and the Basin Street Brass Band.

The Unstoppable Gospel Creators
1:30 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

The Creators' repertoire includes rousing spirituals and spirited hymns that have a contemporary feel even when they sing old-time classics.

Fi Yi Yi & the Mandingo Warriors
1:35 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

The Spirit of Fi Yi Yi is one of the tribes most directly influenced by Africa in both their rhythms and suits. Big Chief Victor Harris has a commanding, passionate voice, and this year's suit, including its huge crown, was one of the prettiest on the streets.

D.L. Menard & the Louisiana Aces
1:50 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stag
e
The famous "Cajun Hank Williams" blends country and Cajun music. With cowboy hat and guitar, thoughtful songs come at the crowd in both English and French. He has recorded prolifically and in 2005 released The Back Door and Other Cajun Classics.

Ivan Neville's Dumpstaphunk
2:05 p.m., Gentilly Stage

The story of Ivan Neville — son of Aaron, former keyboardist for Bonnie Raitt and the Rolling Stones — is a triumphant one, stepping out from the shadows of his father's famous family band to firmly reestablish his own musical reputation as Dumpstaphunk's leader and keyboardist. He remains a touring member of the Neville Brothers as uncle Art's fellow keyboardist. Ivan's a master of the Hammond B-3 sound that marks the Nevilles and the Meters, but also tries out other keyboards and approaches that elicit a harder, more rocking sound that distinguishes himself from Art.

Chuck Leavell with the Randall Brambelt Band
2:10 p.m., Acura Stage

As the keyboardist for two of rock 'n' roll's greatest bands — first the Allman Brothers and currently with the Rolling Stones — Chuck Leavell has enjoyed a phenomenal career. In between those two stints, Leavell was an in-demand side musician and fronted his own successful group, Sea Level, in the late '70s and early '80s. His most recent solo CD, Southscape (Evergreen Arts), features saxophone appearances by former Sea Level bandmate Randall Bramblett and Tim Ries from the Stones' backup band.

Gangbe Brass Band of Benin West Africa
2:10 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage

"Gangbe" means "sound of metal" and this ensemble employs trumpets, trombones and saxophones to fuse jazz with traditional West African music, especially drums and chants. Their soaring music is complemented by the colorful traditional dress of Benin.

Coolie Family Gospel Singers
2:30 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

Traditional gospel is delivered by several age groups within the family. It's Bible-based approach includes hymns and spirituals in the old-school vein.

Julio y Cesar Band
2:30 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage

Two local brothers have played acoustic classical guitar in various styles of Latin music in New Orleans for more than three decades.

The Last Straws
2:35 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

Ostensibly Tulane's houseband for nearly 50 years, the Original Last Straws were established by Robert McIntyre and the late John Chaffe in 1957. Absent Chaffe, the Dixieland group enters its second half-century led by drummer McIntyre, a founding member of the New Orleans Jazz Restoration Society.

Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots with guest Al "Carnival Time" Johnson
2:45 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

Blues harmonica is at the front of Bruce "Sunpie" Barnes' energetic zydeco-rock 'n' roll hybrid. Living R&B legend Al "Carnival Time" Johnson's hit is one of the most enduring good-time tunes in New Orleans music.

Stooges Brass Band
2:45 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Band

This decade-old New Orleans brass band blends traditional brass band music with hip-hop, funk and modern jazz.

World Sax Group
2:50 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

This is basically the acclaimed World Saxophone Quartet without David Murray, but with original members Hamiett Bluiett and Oliver Lake and newcomers Greg Osby and James Carter. The group's last CD, Political Blues, was a searing (in both music and content) indictment of the Bush administration, specifically its poor response to Katrina.

Lil' Nathan & the Zydeco Big Timers
3:15 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

Accordionist Lil' Nathan Williams is steeped in zydeco music. His dad, and fellow Fest performer, is Nathan of Nathan and the Zydeco Cha-Chas. Nathan Jr. seems more than able to fill those shoes. He formed the Big Timers at 14 and incorporates jazz variations into traditional tunes.

John Lee & the Heralds of Christ
3:30 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

Lee formed his first gospel group in 1968 and founded the Heralds 10 years later. One of the most respected traditional troupes in New Orleans, Lee began his prolific career at Fifth African Baptist Church. His fearless style creates a powerful well of gospel fervor.

Better Than Ezra
3:40 p.m., Gentilly Stage

The New Orleans' pop rock favorites shot up to national fame in the '90s and has cultivated a loyal following since hitting the peak of stardom. The group's most recent release is Before the Robots.

Luther Kent & Trickbag
3:45 p.m., Acura Stage

Trick Bag was the longtime after-hours houseband backing visiting blues and R&B musicians. Luther Kent still leads the band's gut-wrenching, no-holds-barred blues rock.

The Dirty Dozen Brass Band
3:50 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage

The Dirty Dozen are longtime kings of contemporary brass band sound in New Orleans. This gang is credited as one of the first to create the hybrid of brass, jazz, hip-hop and funk that dominates today's second lines. Following Katrina, the band reinterpreted Marvin Gaye's What's Going On (Shout Factory) album.

Banu Gibson & New Orleans Hot Jazz
4:05 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

Gibson lends her swinging jazz voice to Tin Pan Alley classics from the '20s, '30s and '40s as well as tunes by Gershwin, Ellington and Porter among other greats. The group has appeared on NPR's Prairie Home Companion and as guest artists of the Boston Pops.

Martha Redbone
4:05 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Martha Redbone came up listening to the Ohio Players and Parliament and has taken those lessons and applied them to her own '70s-influenced soul/rhythm and blues/funk.

John Boutté
4:15 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent
John Boutté is a jazz vocalist who can elicit tears from audiences with his sweet, gentle tenor. He brings a New Orleans flavor to every song that he sings. He has toured with a number of jazz greats from Mel Tormé to Nicholas Payton.

Tony Joe White
4:30 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent
Blues legend Tony Joe White's growling swamp rock cuts across country, blues, rock and soul. Since the late '60s when Elvis Presley covered his top-10 hit "Polk Salad Annie," White (aka Swamp Fox or Gator) has collaborated with the likes of Emmylou Harris, Eric Clapton, Mark Knopfler, Lucinda Williams and the late Waylon Jennings.

Paulette Wright & Volume of Praise
4:35 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

Currently the Gospel hostess at the House of Blues Gospel Brunch in New Orleans, this "full-figured girl from the lower Nine," as she refers to herself, has toured the world singing originals such as "Ain't No Sunshine When He's Home." She's worked with luminaries such as Clyde Jones, Shawn Levert and Aretha Franklin.

Amanda Shaw & the Cute Guys
4:40 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

Graduate of the Kids' Tent — where she was dubbed a "Cajun fiddle wizard" by Rolling Stone in 2000 — Amanda Shaw has long been among Jazz Fest's popular draws. Now 17, the former prodigy is a budding pop star with a record deal from Rounder and music in the Katrina documentary Hurricane On The Bayou.

Judith Owen
4:40 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage

This smooth-as-silk vocalist is a regular on the New Orleans cabaret scene. The blonde canary caresses jazz, pop and Broadway-style tunes with the class and panache of songbirds from the golden age of café society.

ZZ Top
5:35 p.m., Acura Stage

Tough to tell behind those defining beards, but believe it or not, ZZ Top is the only rock band to retain each of its founding members for more than 30 years. That alone would be reason to celebrate. Yet another: The Texas group's longevity is fueled by a bevy of blues-fed guitar licks.

Counting Crows
5:35 p.m., Gentilly Stage

Front-man Adam Duritz leads the early '90s alternative rock band Counting Crows. Last year's live album release New Amsterdam: Live at Heineken Music Hall demonstrates this pop savvy group is not afraid to mix it up on the stage.

George Benson
5:35 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage

Starting out as a jazz guitarist, George Benson recorded with Miles Davis in the late '60s. He went on to dabble in chart-friendly pop and R&B in the '70s and '80s and recorded the original version of Whitney Houston's hit "The Greatest Love of All."

Bob Wilber and a Tribute to Soprano Summit: Remembering Kenny Davern featuring Dr. Michael White.
5:40 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

Mr. Wilber is an internationally acclaimed soprano saxophonist who is influenced by Benny Goodman and Sidney Bechet and has run many repertory bands since the 1960s. On this gig, he pays homage to his longtime late cohort in the Soprano Summit band Kenny Davern.

Gangbe Brass Band of Benin West Africa
5:40 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

"Gangbe" means "sound of metal" and this ensemble employs trumpets, trombones and saxophones to fuse jazz with traditional West African music, especially drums and chants. Their soaring music is complemented by the colorful traditional dress of Benin.

Danilo Perez
5:45 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

This Panamian pianist and composer blends Latin influences with the traditions of standard jazz, which has earned him three Grammy nominations. He has also been praised by Herbie Hancock for driving the music forward.

Tyronne Foster & the Arc Singers
5:50 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

Tyronne Foster leads this young and exuberant choir in its harmonizing.

Walter "Wolfman" Washington & the Roadmasters
6 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

If you hear a howling coming from the stage, it's probably the "Wolfman." Having been credited with the first music gig in New Orleans after Katrina powered by a generator, he is best known as a good old-fashioned bluesman that often holds court at the Maple Leaf.

Creole Zydeco Farmers
6 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

The Creole Zydeco Farmers rose from the ashes of the now-defunct outfit Fernest & The Thunders. Homegrown in Lafayette, the Farmers' latest crop, On The Road (Maison De Soul), arrived in 2005.

Higher Heights Reggae Band
6 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage

This seven-man set up covers Bob Marley songs and does its own originals.

Saturday, May 5

Parades

1 p.m. Golden Blade and Big Chief Trouble & Trouble Nations Mardi Gras Indians

2 p.m. Valley of the Silent Men and New Generation Social Aid & Pleasure Club with Pin-Stripe Brass Band

3 p.m. Ninth Ward Hunters and Mohawk Hunters Mardi Gras Indians

3 p.m. in Economy Hall—Secondline Jammers Social Aid & Pleasure Club

4 p.m. Undefeated Divas and Westbank Steppers Social Aid & Pleasure Club with Storyville Stompers Brass Band.

Gov't Majik — The Dirty South Afro-Beat Arkestra
11:10 a.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

This Afro-beat band evokes expressive dance music with a funky laid-back style. Led by Bru Bruser, the band includes some new members post-Katrina.

Rotary Downs
11:15 a.m., Gentilly Stage

Rotary Downs' spacey, textured psychedelic rock has a New Orleans flavor. Its 2006 release Chained To A Chariot featured a brand-new rhythm section and a tighter, more directed sound that included influences from marching bands to spaghetti Westerns.

Elder Edward Babb & the Madison Bumble Bees of Winnsboro, S.C
11:20 a.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage

This troupe plays sanctified music at the United House of Prayer Church. Think brass band music featuring 14 trombones, but it's absolutely religious. The Bumble Bees rarely play outside of their church, so their performance is something special.

Henry Gray & the Cats
11:20 a.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

Piano man Henry Gray has been playing the blues since before he could drive, hiding his preferred genre while elders were present — the blues were still forbidden fruit in some households in 1940. Discovered by barrelhouse pianist Big Maceo Merriwether, Gray backed Howlin' Wolf until 1968. His 1998 Tribute To Howlin' Wolf earned him a Grammy nomination.

New Orleans Jazz Vipers
11:20 a.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

This seven-piece swing band plays traditional big band favorites. The group honed its trade as a street band in Jackson Square before moving into regular gigs on the Frenchmen Street strip of locals-friendly clubs.

Loyola University Jazz Ensemble
11:20 a.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

The exclusive, award-winning jazz ensemble at Loyola is directed by trombonist John Mahoney of the local John Mahoney Big Band. Its contemporary, improvisational style shows that the members do their homework.

Big Chief Ke Ke & the Comanche Hunters Mardi Gras Indians
11:20 a.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

This Ninth Ward tribe is carrying on the tradition. Big Chief Keith "Keke" Gibson has been masking Indian since he was a teenager.

Johnny Angel & the Swingin' Demons
11:25 a.m., Acura Stage

The big-band era is alive and thriving in the music of Johnny Angel and the Swingin' Demons. A former stylist for the stars — he used to do De Niro's 'do — Angel looks and sounds every bit the part of a throwback Rat Packer on 2000 release Club Deuce. Sinatra would be proud.

Voices of Distinction
11:30 a.m., AIG Gospel Tent

This all-female quintet takes traditional gospel hymns and infuses them songs with a New Orleans spirit. Their singing melds beautiful harmonies and rollicking instrumentation.

Woodshed featuring James Singleton and Roland Guerin
12:15 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

The Woodshed shows feature similar musicians and their handpicked band members interpreting their enemy's choice of song until, in the end, both bands play together. Roland Guerin is known for his slap-bass technique. Singleton is behind many New Orleans jazz groups and stylistic explorations.

Morning 40 Federation
12:20 p.m., Gentilly Stage

The Ninth Ward's favorite ne'er-do-wells are famous for brass-inflected, bluesy, boozy songs about cheap beer and other hobbies. Once a downtown cult favorite for sweaty, blow-the-roof-off shows, the band is drawing more widespread attention with its 2006 release Ticonderoga.

Melody Clouds
12:20 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

A mix of four family members and musician friends comprise this troupe, dedicated to traditional gospel songs. The group was organized in 1965 by the late Leo Jackson Sr.

Jumpin' Johnny Sansone
12:25 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

A blues harmonica player with formidable lung power and a robust singing voice, Sansone's band is also a party starter. Zydeco, roots-rock and blues blend to get people out of their seats and onto the dance floor.

Goldman Thibodeaux & the Lawtell Playboys
12:25 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

Accordionist Goldman Thibodeaux parlayed his zydeco adventures with fiddler Calvin Carriere into the old-style Creole group the Lawtell Playboys. Performing in dance halls, barrooms and house dances across southwest Louisiana and east Texas, the Lawtell Playboys provide one of the few chances to hear French vocals and accordion combined with bluesy Creole fiddle.

Pin-Stripe Brass Band
12:25 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

Almost 30 years old, the Pin-Stripe Brass Band has blended traditional and modern jazz and brass band sounds.

Danza featuring Evan Christopher and Tom McDermott
12:30 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

Danza offers the superior musicianship of clarinetist Evan Christopher and pianist Tom McDermott. It features a more expansive look at traditional jazz as the pair explores the Brazilian influences with an easy flair. They explore jazz deep into its roots, but the music flows as instinctively as if from street musicians. Watch the curious contrast in styles, with Christopher the showman and McDermott the studied performer.

The Dixie Cups & Their Cayenne Pepper Band
12:40 p.m., Acura Stage

The darlings of '60s music, this beloved trio — Barbara Ann Hawkins, Rosa Lee Hawkins and Athelgra Neville Gabriel — sings music from their heyday, including their hits "People Say," "Iko Iko," and "Chapel of Love."

Gangbe Brass Band of Benin West Africa
12:40 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage

"Gangbe" means "sound of metal" and this ensemble employs trumpets, trombones and saxophones to fuse jazz with traditional West African music, especially drums and chants. Their soaring music is complemented by the colorful traditional dress of Benin.

Providence Baptist Church Mass Choir
1:20 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

It's full gospel at its fullest, with a mix of old-time hymns and contemporary spirituals. The choir is based in Laplace and has cemented its place on the region's gospel scene.

Leah Chase
1:25 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

Sultry vocals laid against satiny-smooth jazz. Chase's big voice is polished to a high shine. It floats easily from a slick, urban contemporary sounds to vintage versions of the standards.

Beth Patterson & Kalafka
1:25 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage

With an edge all her own, Lafayette multi-instrumentalist Beth Patterson (ex-Poor Clares) weds Celtic and Cajun sounds like few other artists. Often wielding a bouzouki — the steely Greek cousin to the mandolin — Patterson combined folk, pop and progressive strains together on 2002's adventurous Take Some Fire (Little Blue Men).

Ernie Vincent & Top Notes
1:30 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

Funk guitarist Ernie "Dap Walk" Vincent's namesake track is an early-'70s hardcore soul masterpiece loaded with wah-wah and serious low-down drums and bass. In 2006, he released City Moods, a mixed bag of jazz, funk and blues.

Joseph "Zigaboo" Modeliste & Zigaboo's Funk Revue Band
1:35 p.m., Gentilly Stage

Zig calls himself the "King of the Funky Drummers" and it's no lie. His legendary status comes from his years contracting, syncopating and expanding the beat for New Orleans Meters, possibly the funkiest band ever. His rhythms will make your body contort in ways you never thought possible.

Clive Wilson's New Orleans Serenaders with Butch Thompson
1:40 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

British-born Clive Wilson came to New Orleans in 1964 for Dixieland jazz and has been playing trumpet with the Original Camellia band almost ever since. Pianist and clarinetist Butch Thompson is considered one of the hottest players in traditional jazz today.

Brian Jack & the Zydeco Gamblers
1:40 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

Without a doubt Baltimore's finest zydeco product, Brian Jack leads the Gamblers through a medley of traditional tunes and rowdy originals. Summers spent with his uncle in LeBeau, La., infused the young Jack with an interest in Cajun culture, lasting emotions he now draws from for each of his performances.

Michael Skinkus & Moyuba
1:45 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

A player and also a scholar, Skinkus's master's degree in Latin American Studies is audible when he plays. The Latin and Afro-Cuban jazz explorations of Moyuba explore the world through rhythm.

Buckwheat Zydeco
2 p.m., Acura Stage

Stanley "Buckwheat Zydeco" Dural is one of the zydeco greats. He styles his shows like a horn-blasting soul review, and when he gets rolling, it is impossible not to roll with his accordion two steps and blues.

Elysian Fieldz
2:05 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage

Nearly a year and a half ago, the members of the R&B duo Elysian Fieldz — sisters Arin and Alexis Jones — were featured in a UPN reality show called Let's Get This Party Started to let the world know of their enduring post-Katrina struggles, which included the death of their father while trying to rebuild their damaged home. (A grandmother died soon after.) While juggling school (LSU) and career, the sisters have opened for such hip-hop monsters as Nelly and Master P.

Irma Thomas' Tribute to Mahalia Jackson
2:20 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

We all know that Irma Thomas can sing, but it's when she sings gospel that she reaches even deeper into herself and up to the heavens. This is a special show not only because she rarely sings gospel in public, but also because she is a huge fan of the great New Orleans gospel singer Mahalia Jackson.

The Plowboys
2:35 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage

The Plowboys play countrified rock 'n' roll with twangy guitars and rockabilly beats. It's beer-drinking music to stomp your cowboy boots to.

Nicholas Payton
2:40 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

We don't know what trumpeter Nicholas Payton will bring to the Jazz Tent this year, but we know he will bring it. Might be the electronic jazz of his great record Sonic Trance or the less abstract Wayne Shorter compositions that his latest CD takes on.

Snooks Eaglin
2:40 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

An eccentric guitar virtuoso and New Orleans icon, Snooks Eaglin has played everywhere from the streets of the Quarter to the studio with Allen Toussaint. After 50 years, his wailing electric and acoustic blues and R&B sets are still explosive and unpredictable.

Bruce Daigrepont Cajun Band
2:55 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

One of few Cajun artists playing today who writes new material in French, Daigrepont plays a mixed set of vintage standards and new tunes.

Treme Brass Band
3 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

A longstanding anchor of traditional New Orleans brass, the Treme's lineup has included Kermit Ruffins, James Andrews and the Dirty Dozen's Kirk Joseph. In 2006, the band received an NEA Heritage Fellowship.

Storyville Stompers Brass Band
3 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

As the name indicates, it's all about tradition with this older style of brass band. The blend of jazz and Dixieland is evident in the band's music.

Cowboy Mouth
3:05 p.m., Gentilly Stage

Few bands have cultivated as devoted and loyal a live following as Cowboy Mouth, whose area shows are still cause for commotion after 10 years of incessant gigging. Drummer Fred LeBlanc remains among New Orleans' most energetic frontmen, and 2006's Voodoo Shoppe (Eleven Thirty) finds the group in fine college-rock form.

Elder Edward Babb & the Madison Bumble Bees of Winnsboro, S.C.
3:20 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

This troupe plays sanctified music at the United House of Prayer Church. Think brass band music featuring 14 trombones, but it's absolutely religious. The Bumble Bees rarely play outside of their church, so their performance is something special.

Galactic
3:30 p.m., Acura Stage

Galactic's long-awaited follow-up to 2003's Ruckus promises to be a doozy when it comes out this fall, featuring guest appearances by hip-hop MCs such as Lyrics Born, Ladybug Mecca (Digable Planets) and Juvenile. It just goes to show how far Galactic has come from its days of being tagged maybe once too often as Meters acolytes. (There are worse reputations to endure.) It also transcends any jam band limitations, producing a hard-charging funk driven by Ben Ellman's saxophone as much as Stanton Moore's drums.

Steven Marley featuring Jr. Gong
3:40 p.m., Gentilly Stage

After years of behind-the-boards production work with everyone from Eve to Erykah Badu, Stephen Marley debuts as a solo artist with March's Mind Control (Universal). Boosted by the presence of baby brother Damian "Junior Gong," the album is a glorious amalgam of the Marleys' reggae roots and modern hip-hop predilections.

Twangorama
3:45 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage

Twangorama is a three-guitar string assault (including a 17-string guitarharp) of good-time bar-band country and blues-based rock. Sometimes a fiddle shows up to add to the flavor.

The Holmes Brothers
4:10 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

Describing the sound of brothers Wendell (guitar) and Sherman (bass) Holmes and partner Popsy Dixon (drums) is a sticky wicket, but if you're game for a deft mix of gospel, blues, R&B and even foot-stomping country-western, that's a start. The same group that kicked out a gospel album for Peter Gabriel's Real World record label can just as easily pay homage to Paul McCartney or Tom Waits.

Roy Hargrove Big Band with special guest Roberta Gambarini
4:20 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

How appropriate that this jazz trumpeter simultaneously released albums in 2006 titled Nothing Serious and Distractions — the man cannot sit still. Distractions showcases Hargrove's RH Factor hip-hop/jazz side project, while Nothing Serious continues his forays into straight-ahead jazz. (He once released five albums in one year: 1990.) But there are also his Grammy awards for best Latin jazz performance (with Chucho Valdes and Horatio Hernandez) and best instrumental jazz album (collaborating with Herbie Hancock and Michael Brecker).

Willis Prudhomme & Zydeco Express
4:20 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

Like many zydeco musicians from western Louisiana, Willis Prudhomme has an ear for Cajun waltzes and old-style two-steps as well — for example, Prudhomme's "Cornbread Two-Step," the song that inspired the Beau Jocque's hit "Give Him Cornbread."

White Cloud Hunter Mardi Gras Indians
4:20 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

Founded by Big Chief Charles Taylor, the White Cloud Hunters is a Sixth Ward tribe that has masked for more than 20 years.

Dr. Michael White and the Original Liberty Jazz Band featuring Thais Clark
4:25 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

Dr. White is a clarinetist with his foot firmly in the jazz tradition paved by George Lewis, Willie Humphrey, Danny Barker and Doc Paulin. He formed his own band in 1981, quickly adding vocalist Clark. His set is a lively, swinging walk through old New Orleans.

Darrell McFadden & Disciples
4:30 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

This group features a church-trained vocalist adding urban soul, funk and hip-hop to the gospel songs.

Allman Brothers Band
5 p.m., Gentilly Stage

The Allman Brothers Band is the godfather of the jam-band scene, famous for long, soaring Southern rock guitar explorations. These Georgia good ol' boys have been going strong since the '60s.

John Mayer
5:30 p.m., Acura Stage

John Mayer had been honing his music in Atlanta for years before his 2001 release Room For Squares catapulted him to the top of the pop rock world. Since then, he's collected Grammies, People's Choice Awards and a slew of other accolades. His most recent CD is 2006's Continuum.

John Legend
5:40 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage

Kanye West's no-longer-secret weapon has a smooth croon matched only by his Stevie Wonder-like Steinway massages. Once Again (Sony), Legend's follow-up to his breakout album, Get Lifted, surfaced in 2006.

Gangbe Brass Band of Benin West Africa
5:45 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

"Gangbe" means "sound of metal" and this ensemble employs trumpets, trombones and saxophones to fuse jazz with traditional West African music, especially drums and chants. Their soaring music is complemented by the colorful traditional dress of Benin.

Frankling Avenue Baptist Church Mass Choir
5:45 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

With members scattered throughout the South, this spirited choir has been steadfast in singing the Gospel through thick and thin. Its strong, contemporary repertoire remains intact. Expect an emotional set filled with praise songs that have a greater personal meaning to the singers.

Deacon John
5:50 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

"Deacon" John Moore is among New Orleans musical royalty for his legendary guitar playing. Not everyone knows about his early studio work, which can be heard on Irma Thomas' "Ruler of My Heart" and Aaron Neville's "Tell It Like It Is." Relatively late in his career, Deacon John started focusing on the blues and has put out a couple of his own CDs.

The Iguanas
5:50 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

The Tex-Mex New Orleans rock 'n' roll of the Iguanas is one of the sensual, sweet and fun sounds of the Crescent City. In recent years, the band's songwriting has improved even more, resulting in the group's latest and best record yet, Plastic Nine Volt Heart.

Donald Harrison
6 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

Alto saxophonist Donald Harrison is one of the sublime New Orleans musicians who can straddle tradition and modernity with ease. His Mardi Gras Indian heritage helps infuse a street-savvy funk into his playing, yet he still appreciates the complexities of modern jazz. He and fellow New Orleanian and Art Blakey Jazz Messenger alum, trumpeter Terence Blanchard, once co-led a group together. While his family is soon to be the subject of a Hurricane Katrina-related documentary by Jonathan Demme, Harrison continues to move forward with his music, most recently releasing The Survivor (Nagel Heyer) — noted for its complete reworking of the Duke Ellington classic "Caravan."

Franz Jackson
6 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

With his first known gig dated in 1929, this living jazz legend has played with long-gone greats like Albert Ammons, Earl "Fatha" Hines and Fats Waller. Playing sax and clarinet in the vintage Chicago style, he's one of the last living players to have learned directly from those masters.

Joe Krown Organ Combo
6:10 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage

Piano and Hammond B3 player Joe Krown is a familiar face around New Orleans. He's gigged heavily with is own Organ Combo and held long tenures backing up Clarence Gatemouth Brown in many other arrangements. His most recent release is Old Friends.

Sunday, May 6

Parades

1 p.m. Black Eagles and Wild Tchoupitoulas Mardi Gras Indians

2 p.m. Original C.T.C. Steppers and Lady Rollers Social Aid & Pleasure Club

3 p.m. Wild Apaches and Young Magnolias Mardi Gras Indians

4 p.m. Original Lady Buckjumpers and Original Prince of Wales Social Aid & Pleasure Club with Pinettes Brass Band

Wanda Rouzan & A Taste of New Orleans
11:15 a.m., Acura Stage

Considered one of the venerable ambassadors of New Orleans music, Wanda Rouzan boasts a lengthy career in stage musicals and as the leader of A Taste of New Orleans, singing everything from blues and R&B to gospel and jazz. A consummate local entertainer, she got her start with the tiny, local Frisco label singing with her sisters in the '60s before taking over for David Lastie in A Taste of New Orleans.

Washboard Chaz Blues Trio
11:15 a.m., Southern Comfort Tent

Washboard Chaz and his blues trio produce the barebones kind of music that makes this city famous. Using the washboard for blues and not zydeco has also made Washboard Chaz a unique act.

Chris Burke & his New Orleans Music
11:15 a.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

Best known as "Corky" from the ABC TV hit Life Goes On, Chris Burke brings a hopeful, uplifting concert as he has done for many years to down-syndrome sponsored causes in the past. Sing along, "Obla di Obla da, life goes on!"

Nouveau String Band
11:20 a.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage

A hybrid of Cajun barnburners the Red Stick Ramblers and 1990s swing sensations the Squirrel Nut Zippers, the Nouveau Stringband's self-released, self-titled debut is like a fresh breeze rolling in off the bayou. As the lone female voice, Marce Lacouture's sweet soprano is the perfect foil for the Stringband's man-heavy vocal mix.

007
11:25 a.m., Gentilly Stage

As close as New Orleans gets to a supergroup, rocksteady outfit 007 is the pet project of Jeffrey Clemens (G. Love & Special Sauce), Alex McMurray (Tin Men), Jonathan Freilich (New Orleans Klezmer All-Stars) and Joe Cabral (the Iguanas). But is it irie? With this embarrassment of talent, you best believe it, mon.

Elder Edward Babb & the Madison Bumble Bees of Winnsboro, S.C.
11:25 a.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage

This troupe plays sanctified music at the United House of Prayer Church. Think brass band music featuring 14 trombones, but it's absolutely religious. The Bumble Bees rarely play outside of their church, so their performance is something special.

Maurice Brown
11:30 a.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent

Maurice Brown's trumpet playing melds contemporary jazz with a dusting of hip-hop. He studied music with Alvin Batiste at Southern University in Baton Rouge. Then he went on to win the National Miles Davis Trumpet Competition and perform with Wynton Marsalis, Lonnie Plaxico, Billy Cobham, Von Freeman and many others.

Black Eagles Mardi Gras Indians
11:30 a.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

Golden Wings
11:30 a.m., AIG Gospel Tent

Together for more than 45 years, the Golden Wings Gospel Singers take pride in singing traditional gospel music.

J. Monque'D Blues Band
12:20 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent

J. Monque'D Blues Band pronounced "Jay Monke-Dee" is a throwback to the old backwoods blues of a generation gone, recalling Muddy Waters and others.

Louis Ford & his New Orleans Dixie Flairs with guest Barbara Shorts
12:20 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

Clarinet and saxophone player Louis Ford has musical lineage that goes back to the Storyville days in New Orleans, and consequently he is all about the preservation of jazz. He is joined by Barbara Shorts.

New Orleans Spiritualettes
12:20 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent

The oldest all-female gospel troupe in the city sings traditional worship songs. Led by Ruby Ray, the group has been performing since 1956.

UNO Louis Armstrong Jazz Quintet
12:20 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage

From the graduate program of University of New Orleans, this quintet puts it latest class of students on display. Supported by the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation.

Frankie Ford
12:25 p.m., Acura Stage
Frankie Ford is the Crescent City R&B institution best known for "Sea Cruise." Ford still tours heavily and plays old-time rock 'n' roll and New Orleans R&B. His latest CD is That Can Be Used Again!

Savoy-Doucet Cajun Band with Marc and Ann Savoy and Michael Doucet
12:30 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Mark Savoy, Ann Savoy and Michael Doucet are Cajun powerhouses in their own right. Together they evoke some of the most heartfelt polished Cajun folk music around.

Chops Funky 7
12:35 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage

Papa Grows Funk
12:40 p.m., Gentilly Stage
Papa Grows Funk is a workhorse of a band, putting on legendary shows at the Maple Leaf on Monday nights for the last few years. Its new record, Mr. Patterson's Hat, is so chock full of funk that you need two hands to carry it and an extra booty to shake to it.

Terrance Simien & the Zydeco Experience
12:40 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Zydeco man Terrance Simien injects soul and rhythm and blues into his zydeco, and he has a gorgeous voice that can evoke tears. His latest record, Across the Parish Line, has both original songs and versions of tunes made famous by Clifton Chenier, Robbie Robertson and Randy Newman.

Germaine Bazzle
12:40 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent
She is New Orleans' beloved "First Lady of Jazz," scatting her way into music lovers' hearts throughout the region. A music teacher by day and jazz singer by night, Bazzle takes standards and gives them her distinctive swing. She's smooth, sassy and classy.

Sherman Washington & the Zion Harmonizers
1:20 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
The group is New Orleans' version of "old-time religion," singing hymns and spirituals for 68 years. Group elder Sherman Washington has been at the helm since the beginning and continues to offer true praise songs.

Eric Lindell
1:25 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent
Blues rock frontman Eric Lindell has endured a steady diet of gigs both local and abroad in the recent past and has been winning people over with his soulful touch and feel-good melodies. Many say his 2006 release, Change In The Weather (Alligator Records), is his finest to date.

Allen Toussaint
1:45 p.m., Acura Stage
As a pianist, songwriter and producer, Allen Toussaint is simply legendary. His band is tight and his arrangements never fail to move the crowd. With his songwriting catalogue, he can choose from any number of New Orleans chestnuts, and he always comes out with one number that surprises the audience.

Tim Laughlin
1:50 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health
This native New Orleanian carries on the tradition of local clarinetists like Pete Fountain and Irving Fazola. When not teaching future generations of musicians, he travels the world bringing his brand of jazz to many. His latest CD is Live in Germany.

Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers
1:50 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Once named the "hottest accordion player in America" by the American Accordionists Association, Dwayne Dopsie Ruben is a chip off the old block, namely his father Alton "Rockin Dopsie Sr." Ruben. Dwayne Dopsie started performing as a child with the family's band and broke off to form his own band at the age of 19. His most recent release is The Traveling Man.

Judy Spellman
1:50 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
Schooled in the church choir of her youth, Judy Spellman is known to many as the daughter of New Orleans musician Benny Spellman of "Lipstick Traces" and "Fortune Teller" fame. This year she steps out with her own band.

Jeremy Davenport
1:55 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent
After studying under Raymond Mase, Wynton and Ellis Marsalis, trumpeter/vocalist Jeremy Davenport became the youngest performer on four world tours with Harry Connick Jr.'s Big Band. Jeremy's style celebrates the improvisational, song-and-dance and storytelling elements of old-school jazz.

Big Sam's Funky Nation
2 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
Big Sam believes more is more and tries to live up to his name. The former Dirty Dozen trombonist has tapped into passions for brass and funk. He's been part of Allen Toussaint's Crescent City Horns touring with Elvis Costello, and you may have seen him onstage with U2 and Green Day during the halftime show of the Monday Night Football broadcast of the Saints' season-opening win over the Atlanta Falcons in the Superdome. The group's latest release is Take Me Back (Pony Canyon).

Anders Osborne
2:05 p.m., Gentilly Stage
Perhaps more than any other new-school New Orleans musician, Anders Osborne epitomizes the city's local/global confluence. Though born in Sweden, he's New Orleans through and through. The 40-year-old's soulful singing carries with it the world-weary experience of someone twice his age, and there isn't an instrument or genre that's proven beyond his reach.

Greater Antioch Full Gospel Choir
2:15 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
The choir takes a distinctive approach to contemporary gospel, bringing an R&B sensibility to spirituals. The troupe's members are known for standing stock-still when they are not singing, a move that drives audiences wild.

Betsy McGovern & the Poor Clares
2:30 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage
How many traditional Celtic singers can claim a stirring rendition of "We Shall Overcome" — at a D.C. civil rights rally, no less — as their performance debut? Betsy McGovern's 1992 Fest unveiling of the band, the Poor Clares, probably seemed casual by comparison. 2003's Revival Of The Heart is her latest release.

Nathan & the Zydeco Chas-Chas
2:45 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent
On the accordion, Nathan leads his family band in fast and furious traditional zydeco rhythms. Its latest CD was 2006's Hang It High, Hang It Low (Rounder Records).

Ingrid Lucia
3:05 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health
Ingrid Lucia co-founded The Flying Neutrinos quintet, performing blues, standards and intriguing originals on the American swing circuit. At this gig, Lucia fronts her own band with her extraordinary voice and sultry performance of funky swing and Deep South blues. Her latest release with the Neutrinos is Don't Stop.

Racines
3:05 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do
> Cajun music ambassadors the Racines present a historic tribute to the classic Cajun, Creole, zydeco and swamp blues of Louisiana music's forefathers. Featuring members of the Mamou Playboys, Lil' Band O' Gold and Red Stick Ramblers, among others, the Racines are know to rock amazing double-fiddle solos.

Bamboula 2000
3:10 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
The "bamboula" is at the heart of the African Diaspora — a mixture of rhythm and dance that connects West Africa to the Caribbean and beyond. Master drummer Luther Gray is at the heart of Bamboula 2000, which celebrates the dance-and-drum sessions that dominated Congo Square during New Orleans' slave era. Expect an eclectic blend of fun, African rhythms and reggae with more than a fair share of New Orleans street sounds.

Elder Edward Babb & the Madison Bumble Bees of Winnsboro, S.C.
3:20 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
This troupe plays sanctified music at the United House of Prayer Church. Think brass band music featuring 14 trombones, but it's absolutely religious. The Bumble Bees rarely play outside of their church, so their performance is something special.

Steely Dan
3:35 p.m., Acura Stage
With their fondness for long-division time signatures, near-constant genre-melding and transmogrified progressive melodies, Steely Dan's Walter Becker and Donald Fagan are musician's musicians. Three decades after happily marrying pop and jazz on the platinum smash Aja (MCA), Becker and Fagan are back for a second (third? who's counting?) honeymoon.

Marsalis Music honors Alvin Batiste & Bob French (featuring Branford Marsalis and Harry Connick, Jr.) and the Branford Marsalis Quartet
3:35 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Branford Marsalis has put out a series of CDs honoring some jazz legends. Alvin Batiste and Bob French had their own releases debut in recent months. Marsalis's Quartet is one of contemporary jazz's top groups, featuring ferocious drummer Jeff "Tain" Watts. Connick lends his voice to a few of the tracks on French's CD. This set brings them all together for a unique show.

Rick Trolsen & the Gringo do Choro
3:40 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage
Rick Trolsen's Gringo Do Choro (Lort) is a fascinating sonic tour through the arenas of Brazilian jazz: Bossa Nova, samba and choro, a three-part structure popularized in 19th century Rio. The twist? Trolsen is a New Orleans trombonist, lending the album an out-of-body feel, transposed in both time and space.

Gilberto Santa Rosa
3:40 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
"El Caballero de Salsa" is a critically hailed Latin bandleader credited with developing the unique salsa style soneo, which married jazz-style improvisation with the traditional red-hot dance music.

Joss Stone
3:45 p.m., Gentilly Stage
She's young, barefoot and has pipes to kill for. This is Joss Stone's second appearance at Jazz Fest, and her new record is putting her on track to become a big star, but besides that, she's a good soul singer who doesn't overdo it like many rhythm and blues singers her age.

Marva Wright & the BMWs
4:10 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent
It's been a tough year for The Blues Queen of New Orleans, who over the past year has lost one of her closest friends and supporters CBS News' Ed Bradley, who often introduced her for her Jazz Fest sets. Wright is that rare New Orleans bird, a female blues belter equally at home in R&B, as her cover of Jean Knight's "Mr. Big Stuff" proves on the recent Mardi Gras Records compilation, Ultimate New Orleans. Look for her latest release, When the Levee Broke (AIM Internation), due out for the fest.

Preservation Hall Jazz Band
4:25 p.m., Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health
Preservation Hall is synonymous with traditional New Orleans jazz. The band recalls the early ensemble playing of the city as successive generations of musicians take their turn on the bandstand. Since Katrina, Preservation Hall has been the base for many musicians' relief efforts.

Poncho Chavis & Boozoo's Dog Hill Stompers
4:25 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
Zydeco legend Poncho Chavis (vocals, accordion) causes a dance ruckus in a band with the grandchildren of his late, great father Boozoo.

Dottie Peoples
4:30 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Powerhouse gospel vocalist Dottie Peoples has been called the gospel Patti LaBelle. On the strength of original songs such as, "On Time God," Peoples has been nominated for many awards and gained fans among youngsters, teens and adults alike.

Soul Rebel Brass Band
4:35 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
The Soul Rebels was at the forefront of bringing rap and hip-hop into the brass band fold, but since the storm the band has also been maintaining the traditional side as well.

The Radiators
5:35 p.m., Gentilly Stage
There are those who would lay down their lives in fealty to this quintessential New Orleans blues/funk jam band. The Radiators is as timeless, as energetic and downright immovable now as it was 30 years ago, and that's what New Orleans music is all about. The group released Dreaming Out Loud (Sci Fidelity) last fall, its first collection of originals in five years.

New Edition
5:40 p.m., Congo Square/Louisiana Rebirth Stage
This group of R&B pop crooners has undergone a number of lineup changes over the years with such stars as Bobby Brown, Johnny Gill and Michael Bivins while riding the up and down crest of hip-hop inspired pop music. They've recently been absorbed as part of Puff Daddy's Bad Boy label and have started to make waves again.

Harry Connick, Jr.
5:45 p.m., Acura Stage
Harry Connick has gravitated back to his jazzier/funkier piano playing and vocals, letting go of the crooner phase. His new records feature both big band and smaller aggregations doing New Orleans classics and they are the newest additions to the canon of New Orleans music.


Taj Mahal & the Trio
5:45 p.m., Southern Comfort Blues Tent
Taj Mahal was world music before world music had a name. In truth, there's no term broad enough to encompass all the globe-spanning sounds he's employed over the course of a four-decades-and-counting career. Days shy of his 65th birthday, the pioneer is still vital, with four recordings in the last two years.

BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet
5:45 p.m., Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do-Do Stage
BeauSoleil's contribution to Cajun music and culture is incalculable, to the point where the rest of the world cannot think of Cajun music without thinking of BeauSoleil and its violinist and frontman, Michael Doucet. Last year, it released Live In Louisiana (Way Down Louisiana), a collection of 12 Cajun and Creole songs from a three-decade career recorded live for the first time.

Watson Memorial Teaching Ministries
5:45 p.m., AIG Gospel Tent
Based Uptown, Watson Ministries gospel choir has made regular annual appearances at the gospel tent.

Don Vappie & the Creole Jazz Serenaders
5:50 p.m., Economy Hall Tent
It's a purely traditional approach to Creole jazz. Vappie plays the banjo, and with his orchestra, performs the work of Jelly Roll Morton, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and others.

Benny Grunch & the Bunch
5:55 p.m., Allison Miner Music Heritage/Lagniappe Stage
The king of satire from the parish, Benny Grunch and The Bunch keeps it fun with hits like "I Think I Just Seen Elvis In The Mildew On My Walls" and "I'm Dreaming Of A White Trailer." Aside from his outrageous titles, his prolific output of seasonal material keeps Benny Grunch fresh in the minds of locals.

The Jazz Jam
6 p.m., AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent
The Jazz Jam features a large roster of top local jazz musicians and invited guests. Expect to see saxophonists Donald Harrison and Tony Dagradi, trumpeters Gregory Davis, Kermit Ruffins, Troy Andrews and Maurice Brown, trombonist Big Sam Williams, vocalist John Boutté, sousaphonists Kirk Joseph and Phil Frazier, guitarist Todd Duke and others.

Big Chief Bo Dollis & the Wild Magnolias
6 p.m., Jazz & Heritage Stage
The Wild Magnolias keeps on putting out funky Indian music though it's hard to imagine it could top "Handa Wanda," which Big Chiefs Bo Dollis and Monk Boudreaux wrote. The two created legendary recordings put out under the Wild Magnolias name which set the standard for recorded Indian music beginning in the mid-'70s.

Alvin Batiste with the Branford Marsalis Quartet: 3:35 p.m., - Sunday, May 6, AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent
  • Alvin Batiste with the Branford Marsalis Quartet: 3:35 p.m., Sunday, May 6, AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Deacon John: 5:50 p.m. Saturday, May 5, Southern Comfort - Blues Stage - CHERYL GERBER
  • Cheryl Gerber
  • Deacon John: 5:50 p.m. Saturday, May 5, Southern Comfort Blues Stage
Roy Hargrove: 4:20 p.m. Saturday, May 5, AT&T/WWOZ - Jazz Tent
  • Roy Hargrove: 4:20 p.m. Saturday, May 5, AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Big Chief Bo Dollis and the Wild Magnolias: 6 p.m. Sunday, - May 6, Jazz & Heritage Stage - CHERYL GERBER
  • Cheryl Gerber
  • Big Chief Bo Dollis and the Wild Magnolias: 6 p.m. Sunday, May 6, Jazz & Heritage Stage
The Storyville Stompers: 3 p.m. Saturday, May 5, Jazz & - Heritage Stage - CHERYL GERBER
  • Cheryl Gerber
  • The Storyville Stompers: 3 p.m. Saturday, May 5, Jazz & Heritage Stage
Ellis Marsalis: 1:25 p.m. Friday, May 4, AT&T/WWOZ Jazz - Tent - SCOTT SALTZMAN
  • Scott Saltzman
  • Ellis Marsalis: 1:25 p.m. Friday, May 4, AT&T/WWOZ Jazz Tent
Buckwheat Zydeco: 2 p.m. Saturday, May 5, Acura Stage - CHERYL GERBER
  • Cheryl Gerber
  • Buckwheat Zydeco: 2 p.m. Saturday, May 5, Acura Stage
Ivan Neville and Dumpstaphunk: 2:05 p.m. Friday, May 4, - Gentilly Stage - SCOTT SALTZMAN
  • Scott Saltzman
  • Ivan Neville and Dumpstaphunk: 2:05 p.m. Friday, May 4, Gentilly Stage
Tim Laughlin: 1:50 p.m. Sunday, May 6, Economy Hall Tent - presented by Peoples Health
  • Tim Laughlin: 1:50 p.m. Sunday, May 6, Economy Hall Tent presented by Peoples Health

Add a comment