Fujita: "They call me the Pinko Communist Fag from Berkeley. I'm used to it."



Judging from our readers' reaction last week when Saints linebacker Scott Fujita announced his support for gay marriage, people wanted to hear more from him. Today, Dave Zirin, sports editor of The Nation, conducted a more in-depth interview with Fu on gay rights in general, and it's a hell of a read.

Some quotes:

DZ: You've said to me in previous discussions that one of the reasons why this issue really resonates with you is because of the issue of adoption, and who gets to adopt children in the United States. Can you speak about that?

SF: A year ago or two years ago, I remember reading about an initiative that was proposed in the state of Arkansas. It was some kind of measure that was aimed at preventing adoptions by single parents. Now, the way I read that and the way that I translated that language was that only heterosexual, married couples could adopt children. As an adopted child that really bothered me. I asked myself, what that is really saying is that the concern with one's sexual orientation or one's sexual preference outweighs what's really important, and that's finding safe homes for children, for our children. It's also saying that we'd rather have kids bounce around from foster home to foster home throughout the course of their childhood, than end up in a permanent home, where the parent, whether that person's single or not, gay or straight. Either way, it doesn't matter. It's a home that's going to be provided for a kid who desperately needs a home. As an adopted child, that measure really bothered me. It just boggles my mind because good, loving homes for any child are the most important thing.

DZ: Do you have any concerns that teammates, fans, people will say Scott Fujita may be married and have kids, but maybe on the down low he might really be gay? Do you have concern that teammates, bloggers, the press will talk that kind of smack about you either behind your back or to your face?

SF: No, I have no concern about that whatsoever. I know who I am. My wife knows who I am. I don't care one way or the other, Dave. I imagine that when some of this gets out guys in the locker room might give me a hard time, and they always give me a hard time. They call me the Pinko Communist Fag from Berkeley. I'm used to it. I can take it all.

Fujita sums up his position thusly: "I always describe myself as a pretty open minded and tolerant guy. But the one thing I am most intolerant of is intolerance. That's the one thing, you want to get under my skin, to start talking about some intolerant stuff, and I'm quick to talk about it."

Read Zirin's interview with Fujita here.

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