Events » New Orleans Event Previews

A&E Feature

What to Know Before You Go



The Hives
8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 25
One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361;

Sweden proved the unlikely birthplace of screeching, manic, R&B-based rock when the Hives broke out in 2000 with the album Veni Vidi Vicious , which carried the hit "Hate to Say I Told You So" — a song with more venomous punk attitude than had been unleashed since Iggy Pop told us our pretty face was going to hell. Combining Motown mayhem with gritty garage attitude — plus snappy, eccentric matching black-and-white suits and accessories — frontman Howlin' Pelle Almqvist revitalizes the snarling power of American punk rock 'n' soul and exports it back to our shores tied up in a neat little black-and-white bow. Swedish Invasion, anyone? Its latest record, The Black and White Album, drops stateside in November. Tickets $12 in advance, $15 at the door. — Alison Fensterstock




New Orleans Klezmer All-Stars
11 p.m. Thu., Oct. 25
d.b.a., 618 Frenchmen St., 942-3731;

You might call klezmer music the ultimate fusion sound. Born out of the Jewish diaspora in Eastern Europe and traditionally sung in Yiddish, the common language of nationless European Jews, klezmer blends elements of Romani, Turkish, Greek and other Eastern and Central European sounds, all led by the effusive wheezing of an accordion. Since 1991, the New Orleans Klezmer All-Stars have been adding to that tradition with a raucous New Orleans jam sensibility for famously upbeat gigs more riotous than a good Bar Mitzvah. Blending Ashkenazic attitude with jazz, funk and rock, the All-Stars rarely fail to get the dance floor going. It's been a while since they've played, so it's sure to be a shtetl-shaking good time. Tickets $5. — Fensterstock




8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 26-27
Tulane University, Dixon Hall, 522-0996;

If Cirque du Soleil hadn't raised the circus to an art form, one easily could have guessed that it had taken modern dance and made it crassly commercial. At least one couldn't be blamed for trying to link the wildly acrobatic and surreal work of modern dance troupes like Pilobolus and MOMIX to Cirque's sense of imagination. Dancer and choreographer Moses Pendleton was a founding member of Pilobolus Dance Theater in 1971 and in the '80s formed his own group, MOMIX. As artistic director, he's created pieces based around everything from baseball to creating a passion play. At times using circuslike props, the dancers have showcased a unique combination of strength, elegance, refined dance technique and a narrative approach that's more artistically nuanced than anything Cirque does. This program is a greatest hits collection from its two-decade repertoire of stark imagery, fantastic illusions and evocative physical expression. Tickets $30-$80. — Will Coviello




The Krewe of M.O.M.s Halloween Ball
9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 27
Howlin' Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-WOLF

The mysterious Krewe of Mystic Orphans and Misfits throws down two legendary parties each year. Their annual Mardi Gras ball at Blaine Kern's cavernous float warehouse in Algiers is the more legendary bacchanalia, but the Halloween party is no slouch when it comes to costumed decadence. Long considered the most public private party in New Orleans, the two M.O.M.s parties are thrown by an elite krewe of native New Orleanians with a taste for the odd and spectacular. Their masked antics, curious customs (the dress code at the Mardi Gras ball is famously, costumed or nude) and eccentrically titled royalty have made the group as much of a stalwart tradition as anything this irreverent could be. This year's Halloween event features the conservatory-trained, psychedelic jazz/jam/rock of Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes, as well as a late-night set from Afro/rock fusion masters Toubab Krewe. Tickets $25. — Fensterstock


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